Hindu Council’s FAQ on Hinduism

Share this page on :

Hindu View on Capital Punishment

As an individual a Hindu’s conduct is to always forgive even the worst enemy or not to judge another human being and leave the judgement to the Lord. 
 
As a government the Hindu view is that at times there is no option but to end a life to protect the society from within or from without. This is based on a higher principle that death and rebirth are necessary for the soul to grow and know its own Divinity.

What do Hindus believe about judgement and what is the process of salvation?

We believe in a law of karma that is in operation all the time. There is not the judgement day in our way of thinking. There are multiple ways of achieving salvation and we do believe strongly that accepting Jesus as the saviour is one of them.

What do Hindus believe about Jesus and his role in Hindu faith?

We believe in Jesus as an incarnation of the Divine. We Hindus believe that Jesus, the Divine incarnation, added to the capacity of the human flesh to experience love. This is based on the Hindu concept that every incarnation enhances the ability for the matter that makes up humans to evolve higher. 

How do you think Christians perceive God and his relationship to humanity?

Christians perceive God as someone in heaven who is the ruler of this world. He loves each of His subjects but he is also bound by the law that he has laid down for humanity.

What is the nature of God and HIS relationship to humanity

The nature of God cannot be described in words completely but we are all manifestations of God in different forms. God is present in all of us but we also worship God in a form external to us and in that form God is our protector and God loves us much more than we can love God.

Hindu perspective on euthanasia

Hinduism does permit Prayopavesa or renouncing of food and water which is actually euthanasia.
Prayopavesa literally resolving to die through fasting is a practice in Hinduism that denotes the suicide by fasting of a person, who has no desire or ambition left, and no responsibilities remaining in life.  It is also allowed in cases of terminal disease or great disability. A similar practice exists in Jainism.

Committing Prayopavesa is bound by very strict regulations. Only a person who has no desire or ambition left, and no responsibilities remaining in life is entitled to perform it. The decision to do so must be publicly declared well in advance.  Ancient times law makers stipulated the conditions that allow Prayopavesa. They are one’s inability to perform normal bodily purification, death appears imminent or the condition is so bad that life’s pleasures are nil and the action is done under community regulation.   eg King Parikshit in ancient time had observed prayopavesa and in current time, in 1982 Acharya Vinoba Bhave ( spiritual successor of Mahatma Gandhi) died by prayopavesa. In Nov 2001 Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami subjected himself to prayopavesa. Subramuniyaswami was diagnosed to be suffering from terminal intestinal cancer. He later died on the 32nd day of his fast.

Australia’s first religious same sex marriage performed in a Synagogue

Share this page on :

Australia has recently permitted same sex marriage. While many such marriages have been held in civil ceremonies, most religions have been reluctant to embrace the change and incorporate LGBT in their religious marriage ceremonies.

By Dolly442 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20285641 

Now, a first religious same sex marriage has been performed in a Synagogue.

[Click here to read more ….]

Ray Williams MP wants to stamp out racism in Australia

Share this page on :

Some leaders have recently made racist and divisive statements affecting residents of NSW and Australia.

Upset by these developments, Hon. Ray Williams MP will host a round table with Community Leaders to explore ways to stamp out racism in Australian community.

He is holding a forum on the same 2:15pm, Saturday 26 May 2018

 

Spoken Sanskrit Workshop For beginners in Canberra

Share this page on :

Organised by Hindu Council of Australia

Objective: to give students a taste of Sanskrit as a living language by introducing its basic grammatical structures so that they can start understanding simple texts as well as allow them to use it in daily life. It also seeks to give them an understanding and appreciation of the beauty of the different aspects of this language from its sounds to its rich content so that they feel enthused enough to delve further into it.

This is a basic language course and it would be of interest to persons from different disciplinary backgrounds of science, technology, computer sciences and humanities and social sciences.

When : Sat 2 June and Sunday 3 June, 2018 Time : 10am-1pm & 2pm-5pm

Where : Hindu Temple & Cultural Centre, 81 Ratcliffe Crescent, Florey ACT 2615

Cost : Free, #note

Contact : himanshu.pota@gmail.com or 0426057354.

 Short bio of the Presenter
Dr. Jyoti Raj obtained her Ph.D. on brahmasūtra from the University of Delhi. She got her graduate and post-graduate qualifications from St. Stephen’s College, the University of Delhi. She is an Assistant Professor at Shyama Prasad Mukherji College, the University of Delhi.

She is a news reader, editor, and reporter with DD News Sanskrit section. She is also a Governing Body Member of Delhi Sanskrit Academy. She has conducted several Spoken Sanskrit Camps for School and College Students.

Dr. Jyoti Raj presenting a news bulletin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5S5Yri9Dek
——————————————————————————————-

Note: 1. Participants can attend part of the workshop too.

2. Depending on the number of registrations we will request small contribution for the workshop to cover the travel cost of the presenter.

3. Lunch is included

Tiny Australian towns are inclusive but lack diversity

Share this page on :

While large Australian cities have seen a large influx of different ethnic and religious groups, tiny Australian towns although considered inclusive by some authors, lack diversity of ethnicity and religions. They seem to live in a time warp that existed in Australia before 1970’s. Most new immigrants avoid country towns for their lack of employment opportunities. Most Hindus who came to Australia after abolition of whites only policy, settled in cities though a handful of Hindu doctors  did settle in small towns. These doctors were respected and seen as as an important asset to medical services starved communities.

However most Hindus who came to Australia later, started settling in large cities as a rush of IT and then technicians came in. Later, students immigrating started drifting to medium towns for jobs and small businesses. It seems that tiny towns of Australia are still living in their old familiar ways. It is a matter of time, perhaps one full generation before these new migrants start affecting the way of life of tiny towns as they have done to large cities.

[Click here to read more …]

Hindu Council supports Girmit day celebrations

Share this page on :

Commemoration of Girmit Dewas at Hindu Temple and Cultural Centre of ACT Inc. (HTCC) – Canberra

19 May 2018.

Members of Fiji Community who are members/devotees of HTCC have been marking Girmit Dewas (arrival of the first ship load of Indians to Fiji on 14 May 1879) by hosting a prayer meeting at HTCC premises for some years now and this year it was held on Saturday 19 May. On this occasion, The Hindu Council of Australia (HCA) lended its full support for the event.

The function was officiated by Temple Priest, Acharya Prakash Chandra Pandey, and presided over by vice president of HTCC, Shri Kamal Singh. The program included puja, recital of Ramayana by three mandalies and addresses by Pandits, Anil and Rama Sharma, Shri Prakash Mehta, President, Hindu Council of Australia and Shri Basu Banka, President, HTCC.

In his message Shri Prakash Mehta reminded the congregation that the Indians had Lord Rama with them in the form of Ramayana which they had brought with them and this gave them the strength and courage to face the adversities which they encountered. Regular recital of Ramayana has not only helped to preserve Hindu culture, but also supported to pass language to next generation. It is really inspiring lessons for new migrants. He thanked the organizers’ for hosting the ceremony in memory of their ancestors and the Hindu Council of Australia was happy to support the event.

Approx. 150 people, mainly Indo-Fijians but a growing number from India attended the function. It was also attended by Shri Kanti Jinna, Vice President HCA and Santosh Gupta, coordinator of ACT chapter of HCA

Hindu Council puts a definition to Pure Vegetarian Food

Share this page on :

 

Given a wide variety of definitions prevalent to what is acceptable and what is not acceptable in a vegetarian diet, Hindu Council of Australia has defined a Pure Vegetarian diet that is suitable for Hindus. A Hindu Council Pure Vegetarian Diet (Pure Vegetarian Diet) is a food that has been produced using following guidelines :

  • A Pure Vegetarian diet abstains from all kinds of meat (red meat, poultry, seafood, and the flesh of any other animal), and also includes abstention from by-products of animal slaughter.
  • Like a lacto-vegetarian diet, it includes dairy products but NOT eggs.
  • Pure vegetarians also avoid products that may use animal ingredients not included in their labels or which use animal products in their manufacturing; for example, sugars that are whitened with bone char, cheeses that use animal rennet (enzymes from animal stomach lining), gelatin (derived from the collagen inside animals’ skin, bones and connective tissue), cane sugar and apple juice/alcohol clarified with gelatin or crushed shellfish and sturgeon.
  • All raw materials used including all food that comes in contact (even traces) with the Pure Vegetarian must also have been prepared according to these Pure Vegetarian Guidelines.
  • All production/processing lines, crockery, kitchen utensils and equipments, cooking place used for making or storing the food must not have previously ever been used to process or produce any product that does not confirm to these Pure Vegetarian Guidelines.
  • Pure Vegetarian food must be physically segregated and should not come in contact with other food items which are not Pure Vegetarian, during packing, serving, transportation and storage in Chillers, freezers, cold rooms, to name a few.

Bandeesh music group raises funds for a Hindu charity

Share this page on :

A bollywood music charity program was held on 19th May 2018 in Sydney. It was a house full with people dancing to the tunes of yesteryears. Part of the ticket proceeds is being shared by Hindu Benevolent Fund (HBF) of Hindu Council of Australia. HBF fund was established to provide financial support to individuals and families in dire need of financial help to meet their day to day needs. 

SBS TV records growth of Hinduism in Australia

Share this page on :

SBS (State Broadcasting Services) is an Australian TV and radio network supported by Australian government and specializes in ethnic community news. Decades ago when there were very few Hindus in Australia and Internet had not been invented yet, SBS was a major (and sometimes the only) source of news and entertainment for new migrants to Australia.

In the age of Internet and beaming of TV from all over the world, SBS has reinvented itself as a channel for multicultural Australia. As part of recording religions in Australia, Abbey from SBS has produced a TV program on the growth of Hinduism in Australia. The program was aired on SBS TV and a link to the article is provided below. 

Hindu Council of Australia has recorded the growth of Hinduism in Australia on its website as a part of its eLearing course on Hinduism. A link to that internet based course lesson is also provided below.

Link to SBS program

Link to eLearn Article on Hinduism in Australia

Best wishes on Savitri Puja!

Share this page on :
Written by Madya Lila

Best wishes on Savitri Puja!

Savitri Puja celebrates Savitri, the courageous woman whose loyalty and courage brought her husband back from the dead. Savitri’s story is found in the Mahabharata. In ancient times, Savitri was a princess who chose to marry Satyavan, a prince living in exile in the forest. She left behind her life of luxury and loyally accepted the hardships of forest life where she devotedly cared for her husband and his family. One day, while chopping wood in the forest, Satyavan suddenly felt faint. He laid his head in Savitri’s lap and died. But when Yama, the god of death, came to take Satyavan away from his body, Savitri got up and followed him. Again and again, Yama tried to convince her to turn back, warning her of the terrible consequences to herself if she followed him, but she continued to follow behind him. Finally, Yama offered Savitri a boon, saying she could ask for anything except the life of Satyavan. Savitri requested that she and Satyavan have 100 children, creating a dilemma for Yama. How were Savitri and Satyavan to have children if he took Satyavan away? Impressed by Savitri’s devotion, Yama returned Satyavan to his body and Satyavan awakened as if from a deep sleep. Women who observe fasting on Savitri Puja hope to achieve Savitri’s qualities of love, determination, loyalty and courage as well as a long and happy life for their spouse.

Artwork by B.G. Sharma

Image may contain: 1 person
Hindu Council Australia