Neeraj Gupta’s sculpture awarded by Australia

Sydney, Australia: The Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize, presented by Woollahra Council, today
announced 48 emerging and established artists as finalists for the 18th annual Prize and exhibition. The
finalist group was today from 666 entries this year including artists from Australia, India and the
United Kingdom highlighting the Prize’s growing international reputation.

Delhi, India based artist Neeraj Gupta’s work, titled Drifter – III (2018) challenges what he suggests is
the de-humanisation of art in a modern world of super-technology. Using pigment in white cement to
create a stylised bust, Gupta seeks to reject art as information or reduction and return to art as
emotion, harnessing its mysterious power of transcending history and horizontal time to allow his
viewers to see things acutely.

EXHIBITION DETAILS: A free exhibition of all the finalist sculptures will be presented from Saturday
20th until Sunday 11 November 2018 at Woollahra Council. The winners will be announced at the
launch of the exhibition on 19 October with further details to be provided closer to the time. A series
of Artists’ Talks and Community Workshops will be presented as part of the program.

BACKGROUND ON THE WOOLLAHRA SMALL SCULPTURE PRIZE: The Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize is
a national prize for sculptures of smaller dimensions and has attracted strong support from artists,
collectors, benefactors, critics, as well as the local community. The Prize was initiated in 2001 by
Council to support, promote and celebrate artistic excellence, but also to encourage the local
community to access the then, newly renovated Woollahra Council Chambers. The Prize attracts local,
national and international entries each year.

MEDIA CONTACT: To request artist biographies, interviews, imagery and information in relation to the
Prize, please contact Megan Bentley, megan@articulatepr.com.au or Kym Elphinstone,
kym@articulatepr.com.au, 0421 106 139.

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Diwali ArtSpace Nov 8-20 2018

Come and see an Art Exhibition in Strathfield based on Diwali theme.

 

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Perth Mint releases Diwali 2018 Stamp and Coin Cover

The coin features a representation of Ganesha with his traditional motifs – a lotus flower, an ornamental axe and a mouse, symbolising the deity’s state of enlightenment. The design includes the inscription ‘happy diwali’ and The Perth Mint’s traditional ‘P’ mintmark.

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Diwali themed Art Exhibition

By:Sonali Pathak. 

The Hindu Council of Australia and the Strathfield Council are hosting a unique ‘Diwali’ themed art exhibition.

Visit 

https://www.facebook.com/events/501809670275366/

to register your interest.

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Albury Wodonga Hindus produce “That Girl”

Albury Wodonga are two twin towns in Australia on the New South Wales-Victoria state border, separated by Murray river. It has a significant population of Hindus from Indian and from Bhutan. About 60 members of the local Bhutanese and Indian communities got together to produce a Bollywood-style dance and song titled That Girl. The song has a message about respecting women and includes a verse in Hindi. This is perhaps one of the first art production by an Indian/Bhutanese group from a country (rural) town in Australia.

The project is the brainchild of Melbourne-based songwriter and Community Music Victoria’s diversity coordinator Sarah Mandie. Ms Mandie said it about giving the community the confidence to talk about violence against women and girls. She said the aim was to give women and girls more confidence to stand up for themselves and call out disrespectful behaviour. It also encouraged people in the community to help each other, and connect with health and support services if in need.

 

Watch the video here.

[Click here to read more about it ….]

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Take a Quiz on Hindu Symbols and Icons

Check your knowledge of Hinduism

Take a Quiz on Hinduism Symbols and Icons

Please enter your email:

1. Upnayana is a rite of passage to mark adolescence? Yes/No

 
 

2. While a Tilak can be applied at various parts of the body, Bindi must be applied only in between the eyes? Yes/No

 
 

3. What is the  purpose of performing aarti and the waving of lighted wicks before the deities?

 
 
 
 

4. How many number of cotton wicks can be put into the oil and lighted for an aarti lamp?

 
 
 
 

5. Is it Ok for a married woman to wipe off her sindoor? Yes/No

 
 

6. What is the usual number of beads in a Hindu Japa Mala?

 
 
 
 

7. Rudraksha beads represent tears of which God?

 
 
 
 

8. Conch shells are used in Hindu worship as a trumpet?

 
 

9. What is the difference between clockwise and anti-clockwise versions of swastika?

 
 
 

10. Aum is a representation of Brahma God out of three God heads? Yes/No

 
 

11. Who is the vehicle or mount of Lord Ganesha?

 
 
 
 

12. A Hindu can not apply a Tilak to a non-Hindu? Yes/No

 
 

13. A mangala sutra is worn by wife for the long life of the husband? Yes/No

 
 

14. Playing with colors on Holi festival is called Rangoli? Yes/No

 
 

15. All other Yantras are derived from Sri Chakra Yantra?

 
 

16. Hindus apply a Tilak on their foreheads to express their devotion? Yes/No

 
 

17. A Vermilion red colour Bindi signifies that the woman is married? Yes/No

 
 

18. Vibhuti  means super natural powers acquired through religious practices? Yes/No

 
 

19. A Toran is a decoration hanging at the front door of a home and can be made out of any one of the following (you can tick more than one)

 
 
 
 

20. How many strands of thread does a Janaeu or Yajnopavit has?

 
 
 
 


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Why do Gods look the way they do?

By: Surinder Jain.

Hindus have many Gods and each God has his or her own form. We have Shiva sitting on an ice cold mountain top with a fountain of water (river Ganga) flowing out of the top of his head. We have Ganesh with an elephant head and Shakti shown with up to eight arms carrying weapons and gifts in each.

 

All religions have a well defined concept of The God, Their God. Not all religions however can show you what their God looks like. In fact some religions prohibit showing their God’s or their prophets form altogether going to the extent of calling such an act a heresy. In some religions it is asserted that God created Man in His own image and therefore one can deduce that reverse must be true, i.e. God must look like a man (not a woman, mind me).

By Source, Fair use, Link 

Vishnu from Bali

Vishnu from India

 

But if each religion had to follow Hinduism and depict their God in the form of a picture or a sculpture (murti), and assuming it is permitted, what would their deity look like.

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill scholars went about addressing this issue for Christians. If Christians had to draw a picture of God, what would it look like. Now, this is not the first time that someone has dared to draw a face and picture of a Christian God. Many historic paintings available in Churches in Europe show God as an old white male with a white beard and this is what the scholars must have been expecting to come up with.

After showing a number of different photos (very much like mug shots) to devout Christians and asking them which photo resembles their God the most, they came up with a picture of a Christian God. They found that God comes not in one but in as many forms as human aspirations or groupings.

The researchers found that American Christians see God as young, white and loving. But those with views aligned to liberals see God as more feminine, more African-American, and more loving than conservatives. They see God as older, more intelligent, and more powerful. But everyone in the study seemed to see God as similar to themselves.

God and anti-God

Even though American Christians ostensibly believe in the same God, people perceived God in their own way, their perceptions reflecting their political ideologies and their own personal appearance,” the researchers found. When Christian believers think about God, they perceive a form suited to meet their needs and who looks like their own selves.

If people believe they live a godly life, they’re most likely to see a god that looks like themselves, and it might explain why one person’s perception of hypocrisy of some believers, isn’t to others, basically making their view of God conform to them rather than the other way around.

So, if Christians were to make deities in their churches of Christian God (not that they would or should), they are likely to end up with as many Christian Gods as in Hinduism. 

So, next time you are teased by a non-Hindu for being a Hindu with many Gods, quote this study and tell them to try and come up with a unique universally acceptable face or form of  their own God.

[You can read more about the university study here …. MPR News]

here [NBC ….]

and here [Science Alert ….]

By: Surinder Jain.

(acknowledgements wikipedia photos)

 

 

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Ashraya Band celebrates International Day of Yoga with concerts in Darwin

To celebrate International Day of Yoga, the kirtan band Ashraya will be joining the festivities in Darwin. On their second tour to the Top End, they bring their world grooves and mellow sounds with beautiful ancient mantras that soothe the soul’s inner-most needs. 

Weaving together the mantras with amazing music, Ashraya brings a unique and creative approach to kirtan – from heart-warming, mellow harmonium chants to upbeat kirtan dance grooves. They will be performing at a number of events:

24th June | Habit Breaker ~ Freedom Maker

 
Ashraya is a Sanskrit word meaning shelter. In the beautiful, heartwarming mantras sung in kirtan, we find our shelter from the storms of life. They have performed at a number of locations including the MindBodySpirit festival recently in Sydney and with Hindu Balinese community in the north east region of Bali. 
 
 
The band members are all long term practitioners of Bhakti Yoga in the Vaisnava tradition. Their passion is share the joy that kirtan and the deeper spiritual aspect of yoga bring to others regardless of their backgrounds. They have been inspired to share the yoga wisdom and teachings so that others may apply these in their own lives to optimise their whole well being. You can also catch Ashraya performing regularly on the Gold Coast at the Mantra Room in Burleigh Heads. 
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Art telling Ramayana, Hindu story, at Carlos Museum

An exhibit of art at the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University is highlighting events told in the Ramayana, a sacred text of Hinduism.

The exhibit opened in January, and Coweta residents have been among the visitors viewing the paintings filled with bright colors and elaborate detail. The paintings date from the 17th-19th centuries.

[Click here to read more ….]

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A new film on Love Jihad by Sudipto Sen

Renonwned film artist Sudipto Sen has made a new film titled ‘In the Name of Love-Melancholy of God’s Own Country’. A screening of the film was organised by Global Indian Foundation and Vivekanand Vichar Manch of Jawahar Lal Nehru University in Delhi. The film focuses on the issue of ‘love jihad’ and religious conversion of girls in Kerala and is based on a true story.

Members of Jawaharlal Nehru Students Union and Gender Sensitisation Committee Against Sexual Harassment disrupted the screening. The organizers of the screening in a statement said: “After disrupting the screening of the movie at Sabarmati dhaba, the left-wing protesters grievously injured a guard intentionally.”

[Click here to read more ….]

Summary of films by Sudipto Sen

AASMA (IN THE NAME OF JIHAD) – Hindi feature film – Just Completed
https://pro-labs.imdb.com/title/tt2949654/

LUCKNOW TIMES – Hindi feature film – Completed
https://pro-labs.imdb.com/title/tt4696884/?ref_=sch_int

IN THE NAME OF LOVE!
An hour-long documentary on the issue of religious conversion and so called ‘LOVE JIHAD’!

Project in development:
INDIAN AUTUMN – Indo-US Co-Production film – English/Bengali Bi-lingual film – On Development
(2017-2018)
Hindi/English feature film NUTAN BAZAAR (2017-2018)
History of 5000-years of Indian civilization – A TV Series

Work of reckoning:
English feature film THE LAST MONK (2006)
World Premier at Cannes Film Festival – 2006
Special Invitation Screening at Rotterdam Film Festival – 2006 
Participated in 37 other film festivals

Short feature film AKHNOOR (2007) 
(An Indo-Belgian Co Production) 
Attended 17 International Film Festivals

Malayalam Feature Film ANTHIPONNOVETTAM (2008)
An Indo-French Co Production CORENTIN’S QUEST(2008)
BLUE MOUNTAINS by Suman Ganguli (Consultant)

Documentaries: 
THE OTHER WEALTH (1997) 
A human story on pristine water body near Kolkata
Attended 21 International film festivals

NA BATE DER… (It will not be late) (2003)
A film on revolutionary peasant movement in India
Attended 11 international film festivals 

LAND WITHIN RIPPLES (1998)
A documentary on fast vanishing Islands at World’s largest deltaic region, Sundarvans

Worked For:
THE WORLD BANK (As an empanelled producer 1998-2002) 
PRIME MINISTER’S OFFICE, UNDP / UNIFEM / UNEP / ACTIONAID / ADB / DFID
Made more than 75 Developmental Corporate films

Ad & Corporate
Worked for more than 50 commercials and corporate films

AWARDS
BEST FILM AWARD (AKHNOOR) at Golden Gate Film Festival, USA 2007-2008 
INTEGRATED REALIZATION AWARD (AKHNOOR) at Brussels International Film Festival 2008 SPECIAL JURY AWARD (AKHNOOR) at San Francisco Film Festival 2007 
Best Cinematography (THE LAST MONK) – Cine International FF

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