Take a Quiz on Hindu Scriptures

Take a Quiz on Hindu Scriptures

Please enter your email:

1. According to Mahabharat, how were Vedas created?

 
 
 

2. Puranas contain history and geography of ancient Hindu land? Yes/No

 
 

3. Chandogya Upanishad and Kena Upanishad are embedded in the Vedas? Yes/No

 
 

4. Which of the following Hindu texts are classified as Shruti texts?

 
 
 
 
 
 

5. Shruti texts are considered as core scriptures of Hinduism?

 
 

6. Which of the following is the oldest Veda?

 
 
 
 

7. The word Tantrism can be found in ancient Indian texts? Yes/No

 
 

8. Sutras are like a theorem where in a knowledge has been distilled into a few words? yes/No

 
 

9. Shastaras mean a treatise on a certain area of expertise? Yes/No

 
 

10. Each Smriti text was written by an author and they have gone through many revisions?

 
 

11. Ancient Hindu scriptures were written in which language?

 
 
 
 
 

12. Ancient Hindu history can be found in Mahabharata, Ramayan and Puranas? Yes/No

 
 

13. Sankhya, Nyaya, Yoga, Vedanta and other schools of Hindu philosophy all have the same core scriptures? Yes/No

 
 

14. Vedas were written about 4,500 years ago? Yes/No

 
 

15. Atharva Veda is the oldest record of  practices in medicine and healing of Indo-European antiquity?

 
 

16. Shruti texts were never revised and passed are one from one generation to next as it is? Yes/No

 
 

17. The three main branches of Agama texts are Shaivism, Vaishnavism, Shaktism? Yes/No

 
 

18. What are the names of the four Vedas?

 
 
 
 

19. Do Nāstika (heterodox) philosophies such as the Cārvākas accept the authority of the śrutis?

 
 

20. A Stotra is a piece of prose describing a difficult concept for lay readers? Yes/No

 
 

21. The Upanishads contain philosophical concepts and ideas of Hinduism, some of which are shared with Buddhism and Jainism? Yes/No

 
 
Which religion ism am I studying?

Take a Quiz on Hindu Beliefs

Please go to Take a Quiz on Hindu Beliefs to view the test

A new Hindu Education Centre coming up in Sydney

As Hindu population is growing rapidly in Australia (mostly due to migration), existing temples are struggling to cope up with the demand for spiritual guidance of Hindus. To keep up with the demand, a new Hindu Education and Culture Centre is being planned in western Sydney suburb of Riverstone.

Havan signifying the hand over of land by a donor to the trust is being planned on the site on 8th July 2018. 

According to its President, Prof Nihal Singh Agar OAM, the HINDU EDUCATION CENTRE SYDNEY Incorporated has several objectives, the core being:

  • Establish resources and facilities and centres of learning and teaching Hindutvam, including worship, inculcate spiritual practices and cultural behaviours of followers of Hinduism
  • Build and manage library, resource and research centre on Hinduism
  • Provide centralised facility for Hindu community
  • Provide support and promote activities of Hindu organisation.

The Centre’s constitution stipulates that income, property, profits and financial surplus of HINDU EDUCATION CENTRE SYDNEY, whenever derived, must be applied solely towards the promotion of the objects of HINDU EDUCATION CENTRE SYDNEY as set out in this Constitution.  It also stipulates that the Centre shall not carry on business for the purpose of profit or gain to its individual Members and no portion of its income, property, profits and financial surplus may be paid, distributed to or transferred, directly, indirectly, by way of dividend, property, bonus or otherwise by way of profit, to the Members, or the Board of Directors, or their relatives, except as provided by this Constitution.

The Case for India by Will Durant

Book Review by : Vijai Singhal

The Case for India

This book was written by Will Durant, an American writer, historian and a philosopher in 1930 after visiting India. Given below are some of the abstracts from this book which can be freely down loaded from the Internet. The book was written without the help or cooperation by any Indian.

Will Durant had made an in-depth study of the Indian civilisation, which he declared as one of the oldest and the greatest civilizations that mankind had ever known. He went to India to see for himself but was appalled to see almost one fifth of the human race suffering poverty and oppression bitterer than anywhere on the earth. He had not thought it possible that any government would allow it’s subject to sink to that misery. The British conquest of India was an invasion and destruction of a high civilization by a trading company utterly without scruple or principle.

Writing about the rape of a continent, he says, “When the British came, India was politically weak but economically prosperous. It was the wealth of 18th Century India which attracted the commercial pirates of England and France”. Quoting Sunderland, he says, “Nearly every kind of manufacture or product known to the civilized world existing anywhere had long been produced in India. India was a far greater industrial and manufacturing nation than any in Europe or than any other in Asia. Her Textile goods-the fine products of her looms, in cotton, wool, linen and silk-were famous over the civilized world; so were her exquisite jewelry and her precious stones cut in every lovely form; so were her pottery, porcelain, ceramics of every kind, quality, colour and beautiful shape; so were her fine works in metal-iron, steel, silver and gold. She had great architecture-equal in beauty to any in the world. She had great engineering works. She had great merchants, great businessmen, great bankers and financiers. Not only was she the greatest ship-building nation, but she had great commerce and trade by land and sea. Such was the India which British found when they came.”

The East India Company management profiteered without hindrance; goods which they sold in England for $10 million they bought in India for $2 million. The Company paid fabulous dividends that its shares rose to $32,000 a share. By 1858 the British Government took over the captured and plundered territories as a colony of the Crown. England paid the Company handsomely and added the purchase price to the public debt of India to be redeemed, principal and interest at 10.5% out of the taxes on the Hindu people. Province after province was taken over by offering rulers choice between pension and war. James Mills, historian of India, wrote: “Under their dependence upon the British Government … the people of Oudh and Karnatic, two of the noblest provinces of India, were by misgovernment, plunged into a state of wretchedness with which… hardly any part of the earth has anything to compare”.

“The fundamental principle of the British has been to make the whole Indian nation subservient… they have been taxed to the utmost limit; the Indians have been denied every honor, dignity or office”.… F J Shore testifying to the House of Commons in 1857.

“The Governments’ assessment does not even leave enough food for the cultivator to feed his family” – Sir William Hunter, 1875.

Economic destruction – The English destroyed the Indian industry. India was forced to become the vast market for the British machine-made goods. They ordered that manufacture of silk fabric must be discouraged but the production of raw silk be encouraged. A tariff of 70-80 % was levied on Indian textile while the English textile was imported duty free into India. It might have been supposed that building of 30,000 miles of railways would have brought prosperity to India. But these railways were built not for India but for England, for the British army and British trade. Similarly Indian shipping industry was ruined. All Indian goods were to be carried by British ships. There was a big drain of revenue through payment of salaries and pensions to English officials. In 1927 Lord Winterton showed, in the House of Commons, that there were some 7500 retired officials in England drawing annually pension of $17.5 million. From Plassey to Waterloo, 57 years, the drain of India’s wealth to England was computed by Brooks Adam to be 2½ to 5 billion dollars.

Social Destruction – When British came there was a system of communal schools, managed by village communities. The agents of East India Company destroyed these communities and the schools. In 1911 Hindu representative Gokhale introduced a Bill for compulsory primary education. The Bill was defeated. After British took possession of India the illiteracy rate in India increased to 93%. Instead of education the Government encouraged drinking of alcohol. In 1922 the government revenue from sale of alcohol increased to $60 million annually. There were also 7000 opium shops operated by the British government. In 1901, 272,000 died of plague. In 1918 there were 125 million cases of influenza, and 12.5 million recorded deaths.

There is a chapter devoted to Mahatma Gandhi and his Satyagraha movement. Gandhi was an idealist. In 1914 when the 1st World War broke, Gandhi saw the war as an opportunity for securing Home Rule by proving the absolute royalty of India to England. India contributed $500 million to fund for prosecuting the war; she contributed $700 million later in subscription to war loans; and she sent to the Allies various products to the value of $1.25 billion. The suspension of the revolutionary movement enabled England to reduce India army to 15,000 men. The number of Indians persuaded to join the army to fight in the war was 1,338,620 which was 178,000 more than troops contributed by combined Dominions of Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Indian fought gallantly but none of them were granted a commission. Nothing came of that sacrifice by the Indian people. Lord Curzon wrote: “British rule of the Indian people is England’s present and future task; it will occupy her energies as long a span of the future as it is humanly possible to forecast”.

In the later part of the book the writer has stated arguments from England’s side, for example: “if India has seen the decay of her old domestic handicrafts, it is because she rejected modern machinery and methods of industrialization; India did not exist as an entity, there are seven hundred nativ

e states, forever at war; no common language, 200 different dialects and the caste system dividing the people etc.”. Later on he debunks these claims, for example the British government has always been friendly to caste, because caste divisions make the British task of holding people in subjection easier, on the principle of “divide and rule”. They encouraged Moslem communities to gain weight against Hindu nationalism. Shifting of capital from Calcutta to Delhi was aimed to secure support of Moslems against the Hindus.

In conclusion he states: “I have tried to express fairly the two points of views about India, but I know that my prejudice has again and again broken through my pretense at impartiality. It is hard to be without feeling, not to be moved with a great pity, in the presence of a Tagore, a Gandhi, a Sir Jagdish Chandra Bose, a Sarojini Naidu, fretting in chains; there is something indecent and offensive in keeping such men and women in bondage”.

Vijai Singhal

Spoken Sanskrit in Canberra – a roaring success

A basic sanskrit language course was held with the objective to give students a taste of Sanskrit as a living language by introducing them to its basic grammatical structures so that they can start understanding simple texts as well as allow them to use it in daily life.

Participants got an understanding and appreciation of the beauty of the different aspects of this language from its sounds to its rich content and after the course felt enthused to probe further into it.

Hindu Council’s FAQ on Hinduism

FAQs : Answers to frequently asked questions

 

Hindu View on Capital Punishment

As an individual a Hindu’s conduct is to always forgive even the worst enemy or not to judge another human being and leave the judgement to the Lord. 
 
As a government the Hindu view is that at times there is no option but to end a life to protect the society from within or from without. This is based on a higher principle that death and rebirth are necessary for the soul to grow and know its own Divinity.

What do Hindus believe about judgement and what is the process of salvation?

We believe in a law of karma that is in operation all the time. There is not the judgement day in our way of thinking. There are multiple ways of achieving salvation and we do believe strongly that accepting Jesus as the saviour is one of them.

What do Hindus believe about Jesus and his role in Hindu faith?

We believe in Jesus as an incarnation of the Divine. We Hindus believe that Jesus, the Divine incarnation, added to the capacity of the human flesh to experience love. This is based on the Hindu concept that every incarnation enhances the ability for the matter that makes up humans to evolve higher. 

How do you think Christians perceive God and his relationship to humanity?

Christians perceive God as someone in heaven who is the ruler of this world. He loves each of His subjects but he is also bound by the law that he has laid down for humanity.

What is the nature of God and HIS relationship to humanity

The nature of God cannot be described in words completely but we are all manifestations of God in different forms. God is present in all of us but we also worship God in a form external to us and in that form God is our protector and God loves us much more than we can love God.

Hindu perspective on euthanasia

Hinduism does permit Prayopavesa or renouncing of food and water which is actually euthanasia.
Prayopavesa literally resolving to die through fasting is a practice in Hinduism that denotes the suicide by fasting of a person, who has no desire or ambition left, and no responsibilities remaining in life.  It is also allowed in cases of terminal disease or great disability. A similar practice exists in Jainism.

Committing Prayopavesa is bound by very strict regulations. Only a person who has no desire or ambition left, and no responsibilities remaining in life is entitled to perform it. The decision to do so must be publicly declared well in advance.  Ancient times law makers stipulated the conditions that allow Prayopavesa. They are one’s inability to perform normal bodily purification, death appears imminent or the condition is so bad that life’s pleasures are nil and the action is done under community regulation.   eg King Parikshit in ancient time had observed prayopavesa and in current time, in 1982 Acharya Vinoba Bhave ( spiritual successor of Mahatma Gandhi) died by prayopavesa. In Nov 2001 Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami subjected himself to prayopavesa. Subramuniyaswami was diagnosed to be suffering from terminal intestinal cancer. He later died on the 32nd day of his fast.

Spoken Sanskrit Workshop For beginners in Canberra

Organised by Hindu Council of Australia

Objective: to give students a taste of Sanskrit as a living language by introducing its basic grammatical structures so that they can start understanding simple texts as well as allow them to use it in daily life. It also seeks to give them an understanding and appreciation of the beauty of the different aspects of this language from its sounds to its rich content so that they feel enthused enough to delve further into it.

This is a basic language course and it would be of interest to persons from different disciplinary backgrounds of science, technology, computer sciences and humanities and social sciences.

When : Sat 2 June and Sunday 3 June, 2018 Time : 10am-1pm & 2pm-5pm

Where : Hindu Temple & Cultural Centre, 81 Ratcliffe Crescent, Florey ACT 2615

Cost : Free, #note

Contact : himanshu.pota@gmail.com or 0426057354.

 Short bio of the Presenter
Dr. Jyoti Raj obtained her Ph.D. on brahmasūtra from the University of Delhi. She got her graduate and post-graduate qualifications from St. Stephen’s College, the University of Delhi. She is an Assistant Professor at Shyama Prasad Mukherji College, the University of Delhi.

She is a news reader, editor, and reporter with DD News Sanskrit section. She is also a Governing Body Member of Delhi Sanskrit Academy. She has conducted several Spoken Sanskrit Camps for School and College Students.

Dr. Jyoti Raj presenting a news bulletin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5S5Yri9Dek
——————————————————————————————-

Note: 1. Participants can attend part of the workshop too.

2. Depending on the number of registrations we will request small contribution for the workshop to cover the travel cost of the presenter.

3. Lunch is included

A Hindu Textbook Controversy in USA

The basic complaint by Hindus, including the American Hindu Education Foundation (HEF) is that previous textbooks have given an inaccurate and disparaging portrayal of their religion. While there are many individual complaints the big three are: the emphasis on the caste system, making the Indo-Aryan Migration Theory seem undisputed, and changing ancient India to Southwest Asia.

[Click here to read more ….]

Freedom to teach religion in schools under threat according to Christians in NSW

May 5th, 2018

Rev. Hon. Fred Nile MLC, and Paul Green of Christian Democratic Party, wish to introduce the Anti-Discrimination (Religious Beliefs and Religious Activities) Bill in the Parliament in the state of New South wales in Australia.

According to Paul Green, MLC, the freedom of religious people and institutes are under attack and that this Bill will protect their rights, including protection from mistreatment on the grounds of faith. He is deeply concerned that without this bill, the ability to teach religion in schools and operate charities with Government funding will come under attack. 

“We are working to safeguard the ability of faith-based Schools to teach faith-based values without penalty, as well as ensuring religious groups do not lose their charitable status because of their faith.” said Hon. Paul Green MLC.

Rev. Hon .Fred Nile MLC says that free conscience including freedom to pursue ones own faith, is fundamental to Australian social values. “Every human being should live by their own conscience, including religious conscious” concluded Hon. Paul Green MLC. 

Hon Paul Green MLC is seeking the support of all faith groups to show their support for his Bill.

You can read more about the Bill at his website here.

Bible lessons should be a must for Hindu students, says Christian activist

Australian students should be ­required to study the Bible as part of a well-rounded education, ­regardless of their religious background, according to American investor and Christian activist Chuck Stetson. 

“I argue that if you don’t have knowledge of the Bible you can’t understand the English language, literature, history, art, music or culture fully,” he told The Australian, after speaking at a forum in Sydney.

[Click here to read more ….]