Office goers crowd relishes Diwali in Sydney

By : Surinder Jain.

Hindu Council of Australia celebrated Diwali festival in Martin Place, the heart of Sydney today on 31st October 2018. Martin Place is a pedestrian mall in the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Office lunch time crowd

Martin Place has been described as the “civic heart” of Sydney. A water fountain is located on the east side of Pitt Street, near the Commonwealth Bank of Australia building. Behind this fountain is an amphitheatre, which features a stage where Diwali was celebrated.

Martin Place Diwali 2018, Crowd gathered to watch cultural performances

This part of Martin Place has been popular with office goers at lunch time and today was no different.  Hundreds of Australian in well dressed office suits thronged the area. Some came and sat down in the amphitheatre biting their lunch while others were just curious onlookers on their way to and back from take away lunch shops to their offices.

Watching Diwali and sinking in the atmosphere

A number of shops with goods ranging from Indian food to Indian handicrafts and various services like banking, real estate added to the charm of the show for onlookers. Diwali ArtSpace exhibition showing a small sample of two paintings was quite popular exposing many Australians to Hindu Art genre for the first time.

Indian Art work and handicrafts

The program consisted of various classical and bollywood dances by emerging and well known dancers in Sydney. The program was busy with people between 12 to 2pm.

 

Cherrybrook Village celebrates Diwali with Hindu Council

By : Surinder Jain.

Hindu Council of Australia in association with Cherrybrook shopping centre celebrated Diwali festival inside the shopping centre on 28th October 2018. Space inside of the shopping centre was converted into a stage for performances, a Saree tying workshop, a Diya painting workshop for children, a free henna workshop and a flower Rangoli that will stay in the centre for a few days even after the festival is over.

Cherrybrook Village Shopping Centre

Federal MP Julian Leeser and state MP Damian Tudehope were present in the event. MP Damien congratulated the Indian community for organizing Diwali festival first time ever in the suburb of Brookvale. MP Leeser comended the Indian and Hindu community in Cherrybrook and invited more Indians to come and live in this area.

Federal MP Julian Leeser in a Kurta saying Happy Diwali

MP Leeser said that Indians and Australians have been working arm in arm since the first World war and that tradition of working together continues till day.

Federal MP Julian Leeser and State MP Damien Tudehope dancing to a Bollywood tune

Both MPs danced with bollywood dance performers on music tunes and stayed until the closing time. Many onlookers who had come to do the shopping joined many of the workshops and got a taste of Diwali festivities. A special Rangoli workshop was arranged to teach people how to make a Rangoli.

Rangoli making workshop

A Hindu Art exhibition was also held.  Paintings of Rama and Krishna were on display for all to see and admire. A mini Ram Leela with Ravan and Ram was held and people were queuing up to take a selfie with both.

Henna workshop

Free Henna shop was quite a hit with both Indian and Australian residents of Cherrybrook.

Teaching how to tie a Saree to young Australians

 

The Cherrybrook team of Hindu Council who made this festival a success.

Diwali ArtSpace final 2018 Catalogue

The final catalogue of all arts entries for 2018 Diwali ArtSpace.

ArtSpaceCatalogue-DAE-Catalogue-5-Online

Goddess Kali gets Special Commendation by Woolahra Council in Vaucluse Australia

By : Surinder Jain.

Vaucluse is a harbour suburb in the Woollahra council within Sydney, Australia. It is one of the most fashion and art conscious highly sought after suburb with a very high average income. The Council runs an annual Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize (WSSP) and attracts some of the best artists in Australia and overseas. It brings together a collection of finalists from preeminent to the lesser known.

Pointy Gold Head Kali

WSSP Exhibition

This year it had 46 finalists whose sculptures were on display in the Council building with an entry by Neeraj Gupta from India. The mayor of Woollahra opened the exhibition and announced the prizes. A special commendation prize was awarded to a Kali sculpture made by a Fiji Indian now Australian artist Ramesh. The award was presented to artist Ramesh by the mayor of Woollahra Council Peter M Cavanagh.

 

 

The Kali sculpture called “Pointy Gold Head” was chosen by the judges to be awarded a Special Commendation. The sculpture is a 24-carrat gold plated bronze statue of the face of Goddess Kali with her tongue protruding out. According to its artist Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran, the material used included clay, shells, rubber hoses and cardboard and one can find these objects embedded in the surface. The artwork was made permanent through bronze casting and Gold Plating Process, a direct reference to representations of the Hindu Goddess, Kali.

 

We caught up with the artist and asked him

Q. what inspired you to make a sculpture of Goddess Kali.

A. I was making a face out of various waste material and a sudden inspiration caused me to pull the tongue out. Before I knew it, face of Goddess Kali had already been made.

 

Ramesh with Commendation from Mayor

Q. Why did you Gold Plate the face with 24 carat Gold.

A. To reflect the immense power and glory of the Goddess, I had to imbue it with some thing of extreme value. Pure 24 carat Gold lets that happen.

Q. Where were you born.

A. I was born here in the suburb of Auburn in Sydney though my parents had come to Australia from Fiji.

 

Sri Lankan-born, Sydney-based artist Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran creates rough-edged, vibrant, new-age idols. He experiments with form and scale in the context of figurative sculpture to explore politics of sex, the monument, gender and religion. Formally trained in painting and drawing his practice has a sculptural emphasis which champions the physicality of art making. These works are often stacked to form totems or perched atop customised plinths.
 
 
While proceeding from a confident atheist perspective, Nithiyendran draws upon his Hindu and Christian heritage as reference points as well as a large range of sources including the internet, pornography, fashion and art history. Self-portraits make frequent appearances and the dual presence of male and female organs suggest gender fluid realms of new possibilities. 
 
He has exhibited at various spaces and contexts including the 2018 Dhaka Art Summit, the encounters section for Art Basel Hong Kong, the Art Gallery of South Australia’s flagship exhibition, the 2016 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art and The National: New Australian Art 2017. He has presented solo exhibitions at the National Gallery of Australia, The Ian Potter Museum of Art and the Shepparton Art Museum. In 2014, Nithiyendran was awarded the 2014 NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (emerging) administered through Artspace. In 2015, he was the winner of the 2015 Sidney Myer Fund Australian Ceramic Award, Australia’s richest and premier award for artists working in the medium of ceramics.
 
His work is held in various collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of South Australia, The Art Gallery of Western Australia, Artbank, The Ian Potter Museum of Art and the Shepparton Art Museum. The sculpture is available for sale at a price of Australia $19,800.

 

Organizer Lyn with the Author and Neeraj’s Mind’s Eye

Neeraj Gupta from India had also been selected as a finalist for his sculpture Mind’s Eye which was priced at $12,000.

A 3D printed figurine of real people

 

Neeraj Gupta’s sculpture awarded by Australia

Sydney, Australia: The Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize, presented by Woollahra Council, today
announced 48 emerging and established artists as finalists for the 18th annual Prize and exhibition. The
finalist group was today from 666 entries this year including artists from Australia, India and the
United Kingdom highlighting the Prize’s growing international reputation.

Delhi, India based artist Neeraj Gupta’s work, titled Drifter – III (2018) challenges what he suggests is
the de-humanisation of art in a modern world of super-technology. Using pigment in white cement to
create a stylised bust, Gupta seeks to reject art as information or reduction and return to art as
emotion, harnessing its mysterious power of transcending history and horizontal time to allow his
viewers to see things acutely.

EXHIBITION DETAILS: A free exhibition of all the finalist sculptures will be presented from Saturday
20th until Sunday 11 November 2018 at Woollahra Council. The winners will be announced at the
launch of the exhibition on 19 October with further details to be provided closer to the time. A series
of Artists’ Talks and Community Workshops will be presented as part of the program.

BACKGROUND ON THE WOOLLAHRA SMALL SCULPTURE PRIZE: The Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize is
a national prize for sculptures of smaller dimensions and has attracted strong support from artists,
collectors, benefactors, critics, as well as the local community. The Prize was initiated in 2001 by
Council to support, promote and celebrate artistic excellence, but also to encourage the local
community to access the then, newly renovated Woollahra Council Chambers. The Prize attracts local,
national and international entries each year.

MEDIA CONTACT: To request artist biographies, interviews, imagery and information in relation to the
Prize, please contact Megan Bentley, megan@articulatepr.com.au or Kym Elphinstone,
kym@articulatepr.com.au, 0421 106 139.

Art telling Ramayana, Hindu story, at Carlos Museum

An exhibit of art at the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University is highlighting events told in the Ramayana, a sacred text of Hinduism.

The exhibit opened in January, and Coweta residents have been among the visitors viewing the paintings filled with bright colors and elaborate detail. The paintings date from the 17th-19th centuries.

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