Take a Quiz on Hindu Diaspora

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The population of Hindus in Pakistan and in Bangladesh has remained stable since after their independence? Yes/No

 
 

Hinduism was the main religion of Cham people in Central and South Vietnam between 2nd and 15th century? Yes/No

 
 

Why did last of the Java Hindu Kings retreated Bali?

 
 
 
 

After gaining its independence in 1957, Malaysia became a secular country? Yes/No

 
 

Like Malayasia and Indoneasia, Hindus in Singapore also suffer religious prosecution? Yes/No

 
 

Hinduism is the leading single religion of the Indo-Caribbean communities of the West Indies? Yes/No

 
 

When did the first the Arya Samaj missionary arrive in French Guyana?

 
 
 
 

Most Hindus in Singapore today are ethinic Indians? Yes/No

 
 

What is known as a Bimong in the Cham language of Vietnam?

 
 
 

When did the first Hindus came to Australia?

 
 
 
 

According to the Australian census of 2016, Hinduism was the fastest growing religion of Australia? Yes/No

 
 

Did Khmer Hindu society of Cambodia had the Hindu four varna system for classifying the society? Yes/No

 
 

Hinduism came to Singapore between 7th and 10th century? Yes/No

 
 

Khmer empire of Cambodia were Hindu kings? Yes/No

 
 

Most Malaysian Hindus are Tamils? Yes/No

 
 

Which people’s Hinduism was known by these names, namely Tirta, Trimurti, Hindu, Agama Tirta, Siwa?

 
 
 
 

Like Indian Hindus, do Balenese Hindus also have four varnas of classification in their society? Yes/No

 
 

When and where was a first Ravan effigy ever, burnt in Australia?

 
 
 
 

Which religion replaced Hinduism as the main religion of Khmer in 13th century?

 
 
 

In Bali, the word Pura means?

 
 
 
 

Fiji Hindus are also classified into four varna system? Yes/No

 
 

The earliest evidence of Hinduism in Java comes from which century?

 
 
 
 

There are no Hindu temples left in Pakistan? Yes/No

 
 

Nyepi and Galungan are Buddhist festivals of south east Asia? yes/No

 
 

Many non-Balanese communities follow practices very akin to Hinduism? Yes/No

 
 

The earliest influence of Hinduism can be traced by archeological evidence to be from around

 
 
 

When did the first Ganesh visarjana festival was held in Sydney with clay Ganesha being immersed in the ocean at Stanwell Tops beach?

 
 
 
 

Which province do most Pakistani Hindus live in Pakistan?

 
 
 

Hinduism came to Fiji as Hindu contract workers started arriving there from 1879 onwards? Yes/No

 
 

Java was ruled by Hindu kings from 4th to 15th century? Yes/No

 
 

When did the first Malay Hindu state appear in Malaysia?

 
 
 
 

In which country is Ramakien (Ramayana) is a popular epic and Ayutthaya (Ayodhya) is a city named after the birth place of Rama?

 
 
 
 

Which country held until 1935, a swing festival known asTriyampavai-Tripavai whose name is derived from names of two Tamil language Hindu chants: Thiruvempavai and Thiruppavai meaning “opening the portals of Shiva’s home”?

 
 
 
 

Hindus in South America, are chiefly the descendants of Indian indentured labourers? Yes/No

 
 

Take a Quiz on Hindu History

Take a Quiz on Hindu History

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Hinduism and the scientific heart – a book review

Pavan Verma of JDU has written a book on Adi Shankaracharya. His interview is very informative and is given below. Pavan Varma is a celebrated diplomat, cultural catalyst and public intellectual. His new book on the Shankaracharya throws startling light about Hinduism and its fascinating relationship with science.
 
 
 

Europeans brought their caste system into India

By:Surinder Jain, 2nd July 2018.

It is known what the word caste used so commonly in India comes from ‘casta’ in Portuguese. In Spanish America (and many other places), racial categories were formal legal classifications. Racial categories had legal and social consequences, since racial status was an organizing principle of Spanish colonial rule.

The system of castas was more than socio-racial classification. It had an effect on every aspect of life, including economics and taxation. Both the Spanish colonial state and the Church required more tax and tribute payments from those of lower socio-racial categories.[1][2]

Spanish ideas about purity of blood (which historically also related to its reconquest of Spain from the Moors), the colonists established a caste system in Latin America by which a person’s socio-economic status generally correlated with race or racial mix in the known family background, or simply on phenotype (physical appearance) if the family background was unknown.

Other methods of categorization were based on the degree of acculturation to Hispanic culture, which distinguished between gente de razón (Hispanics, literally, “people of reason”) and gente sin razón (non-acculturated natives), concurrently existed and supported the idea of the racial classification system. Castas is a Spanish word that is used in New Mexico history to describe pueblo people and New Mexicans. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, European elites created a complex hierarchical system of race classification. 

Cagots (a minority found in the west of France and northern Spain) were forced to use a side entrance to churches, often an intentionally low one to force Cagots to bow and remind them of their subservient status.[10] This practice, done for cultural rather than religious reasons, did not change even between Catholic and Huguenot areas. They had their own holy water fonts set aside for Cagots, and touching the normal font was strictly forbidden.[11] These restrictions were taken seriously; in the 18th century, a wealthy Cagot had his hand cut off and nailed to the church door for daring to touch the font reserved for “clean” citizens.[12]

Holy water font for Cagots in Oloron cathedral, Béarn

Cagots were expected to slip into churches quietly and congregate in the worst seats. They received the host in communion only at the end of a stick. Many Bretons believed that Cagots bled from their navel on Good Friday.[7]

 

A page from the manuscript Seventy-two Specimens of Castes in India, which consists of 72 full-color hand-painted images of men and women of various religions, occupations and ethnic groups found in Madura, India in 1837, which confirms the popular perception and nature of caste as Jati, before the British made it applicable only to Hindus grouped under the varna categories from the 1901 census onwards.

It is this system of “casta” that was applied by the British in India to classify Indian society into castes and then mistakenly assumed a caste (jati) to be a part of the four varnas.

(credit:wikipedia)

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Take a Quiz on Hindu Society and Institutions

Take a Quiz on Hindu Society and Institutions

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Take a Quiz on Hindu Festivals

Test your knowledge about Hindu festivals.

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A capsule course on Hinduism in Canberra, sign up now

Hindu Council is conducting a capsule course on Hindu philosophy and Hinduism in Canberra. This capsule course on Hindu Philosophy is presented as a series of ten sessions of two hours each. The course will cover ten fundamental topics.
Rational inquiry is the basis for Hindu beliefs and rituals. These ten sessions will introduce the methods of rational inquiry used by Indians and connect them to our daily practices.

Hindu Philosophy is a vast subject and these ten sessions are meant to give an introduction to ten topics and also to provide directions to students who want to study further with a rational inquiring mind.

The topics will be covered in a manner similar to a university course with an assignment component so that the participants can apply what they have learnt.

Venue:
Canberra – Churches Center, Suite 26 , Level 2, 54 Benjamin Way, Belconnen. (Opp ABS building).
Date: 21 July to 22 Sept- every Saturday 10.00 am to 12.00 pm.

Interstate – To be connected through Zoom ( video meeting room)

[Please click here for online sign up]

Take a Quiz on Hindu Symbols and Icons

Check your knowledge of Hinduism

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What Does Yoga Have to Do with Hinduism?

By: Hindu Human Rights

Yoga is a deep science revealed by Mahadeva Himself in the Agamas. It is not just moving your arms and legs! Yoga is deeply rooted in Hinduism, sourced in Hinduism, and includes all aspects of Hinduism. It is not a “spiritual” practice alone, but is a sacred Hindu RITUAL. Any yoga teachers, gurus who promote yoga as a mere spiritual practice are diluting and misrepresenting yoga, and pose danger to the ones practicing it. Beer yoga, chicken yoga are not only NOT yoga, they are dangerous, and unscientific. They do damage to those who practice it. It is important for every yoga practitioner & teacher to understand that yoga is a SCIENCE to realize, experience bliss and divinity. It is divinity expressing through you, not you trying to reach divinity. You need to set the sankalpa, chant the mantras, do the pranayama & achamaneeyam, mudras and invoke Bhagwan before doing asanas.

 

 

Take a quiz on Hindu Rituals

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