Gargi Woman Award Press Release

Hindu Council of Australia institutes award for recognizing Australian women

 Sydney : 12 February 2018

 Hindu Council of Australia has instituted annual awards to recognise outstanding contribution by Australian women in the society. The awards would be across multiple categories and will be announced on the occasion of International Woman’s day 2018.

 Speaking about the awards, the President of Hindu Council of Australia, Mr. Prakash Mehta said, “We want to recognise women who have been tirelessly contributing to the Australian society for a number of years. Some of them are well known in their field of work and some less known yet their contribution has been immense. With these awards we aim to recognise their hard work and create role models for younger generation of Hindu girls and women growing up in Australia.”

Further adding Mr. Mehta said, “These awards have been named after the great Hindu Rishika (female sage philosopher) Gargi Vachaknavi. Born around 700 BC, Gargi’s philosophy addresses metaphysical questions about the construction and origin of the universe and is considered to be the first, among many, in the long history of women’s intellectual contributions to human society. So, it’s only fitting that we named the awards her”.
 
The awards will be presented to the recipients during the Parramasala Festival in Parramatta on 11th March 2018.

For further details please contact us.

HCA youth join Youth Parliament of World’s Religions Cabinet

Hindu Council of Australia has joined seven other religious groups under the auspicious of Columban Centre for Christian-Muslim relations to conduct Youth Parliament of World’s Religions (PoWR). This will be the fourth year for Youth PoWR. The event is funded by the Columban Centre and may also be assisted by Multicultural NSW.

Youth PoWR is by youth, for youth, with youth. It is planned by a team of young people from various state and national peak religious bodies (the “Cabinet”) who met every month to arrange venue, speakers, process, catering and promotion; they do all the preparatory work and run the event. The speakers and the performers are all youth. The audience participants (the “Members of Parliament”) are all youth.

The youth meet in August/September which is called Youth Parliament and pass resolutions about religious harmony. Accordingly, seven young people from seven different religions addressed the Message to Civic and Religious Leaders

Here is some of what they had to say:

  • The leaders of our faith must foster cooperation and commitment on an ongoing basis, and lead us towards the common good in a world where the good is not always common. (Daniel Ang)
  • I call on the civic leaders present to inspire us with their dialogue and unify us with just policies. Policies which support the weakest and most vulnerable of society. Which embrace freedom of speech but protect an individual’s right to adhere to his or her faith. I call on civic leaders to resist a climate of fear-mongering and uncertainty. To remind us of the successes we are capable of achieving collectively. (Fay Muhieddine)
  • Leaders play a key role to educate the hearts of the youth to be open to all, embrace differences and respect one another, to learn how to live and breathe in harmony. You are the key to building a diverse and harmonious society of which we are all a part. (Su Sian Teh)

With ringing endorsements from the speakers, the message was then voted on and approved unanimously.

Ms Vincy Jain, our youth leader will be a part of the “Cabinet” which will make the event happen. During the planning of the event more youth will be involved. A large gathering of Hindu youth will be mobilized for the main event.

 

SBS Gujarati Radio – Chaplaincy Interview

Click the link below

હિન્દૂ ચેપલન્સી તાલીમ શિષ્યવૃત્તિ પ્રોગ્રામ

SBS Hindi – Hindu Chaplaincy

Click here to hear the talk.

 

Dr Agar honoured on Australia Day

His dedication to the Hindu society has earned Professor Nihal Agar the membership of the Order of Australia in the Australia Day Honours List.

This resident of viagrausa-online.com – info Lane Cove is not your ordinary Australian. He came to Australia way back in 1967 to the University of New England on a post-doctoral Fellowship. In 2009, he retired as the Professor and Head of the Department of Physiology from there.

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He is also the founding member of one of the largest organisations dedicated to the Hindus of the world. Dr Agar also founded the Ekal Foundation Australia in 2007 and joined the Hindu Council of Australia in 2010.

Such is his dedication towards the Hindu community that he earned himself the membership of the Order of Australia. Twenty territory citizens were honoured on January 26 marking the Australia Day Order.

Nihal Singh Agar received this award for this service to the Hindu community in Australia. He has been behind promoting cross-cultural cooperation.

Today, he is an honorary associate in the school of molecular bioscience at the University of Sydney.

He was among the 824 Australians honoured with 613 General Division appointments in the Order of Australia and 211 Australians recognised through meritorious and military awards.

Dr Nihal Singh Agar
  • Chairman, Hindu Council of Australia, since 2009
  • Representative, Australian Partnership of Religious Organisations, current
  • Representative, Deepavali Advisory Committee, Community Relations Commission, 2012
  • Founding President, Hindu Education and Culture Centre, since 2012.
  • Founding President, Ekal Vidyalaya Foundation, 2004-2010; Executive Committee Member,
  • Founding President, Vishva Hindu Parishad, 1990-2005.
  • Founding Member, Sri Venkateswara Temple Association, since mid-1980s.
  • Volunteer, Australia Uttarakhand Relief Fund, 2013.
  • Member, Sub-Continent Ministerial Consultative Committee, Australian Government, 2012.
  • Member, Indian Ministerial Consultative Committee, New South Wales Government, since
  • 2011; Chairman, Education Sub-Committee, 2012.
  • Honorary Associate, School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, since 2001.
  • Former Professor and Head of Department, Department of Physiology, University of New
  • England; Faculty Member, 1967-2000.

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