Hindus fear takeover of their temples in Malaysia

Malaysian government is proposing the formation of a Hindu Endowment Board (HEB) in all states with a sizeable Hindu population is to manage all Hindu temples. Hindus view this move of the Malaysian government with suspicion. 

To assuage the fears of the Hindu community, a government spokesperson has said that it is not the aim of the board to take over temples. There has been some misrepresentation of the functions of the board by some individuals who want to settle old scores with some temple managements in the country who were closely aligned with the BN government. The board will serves to protect existing temples, work closely with existing temple committees, and more importantly find ways and means to advance the religious, social and economic interests of Hindu or Indians in the country.

Islam is the official religion of Malaysia. The constitution of Malaysia declares that Islam is the only religion of true Malay people and that natives are required to be Muslims.[22] Conversion from Islam to Hinduism (or another religion) is against the law, but the conversion of Hindus, Buddhists and Christians to Islam is welcomed. The government actively promotes the spread of Islam in the country.[6] The law requires that any Hindu (or Buddhist or Christian) who marries a Muslim must first convert to Islam, otherwise the marriage is illegal and void.[6] If one of the Hindu parents adopts Islam, the children automatically become Muslim without the consent of the second parent.[5][23]

In recent decades, there have been increasing reports of religious persecution of Hindus, along with other minority religions, by various state governments of Malaysia and its Sharia courts.[5][8] Hindu temples built on private property, and built long before Malaysian independence, have been demolished by Malaysian government officials in recent years.[9]

After a violent conflict in Penang between Hindus and Muslims in March 1998, the government announced a nationwide review of unlicensed Hindu temples and shrines. However, implementation was not vigorous and the program was not a subject of public debate.

Between April to May 2006, several Hindu temples were demolished by city hall authorities in the country, accompanied by violence against Hindus.[25] On 21 April 2006, the Malaimel Sri Selva Kaliamman Temple in Kuala Lumpur was reduced to rubble after the city hall sent in bulldozers.[26] The authorities’ excuse was that these temples were unlicensed and squatting on government land.

The president of the Consumers Association of Subang and Shah Alam in Selangor had been helping to organise efforts to stop the local authorities in the Muslim dominated city of Shah Alam from demolishing a 107-year-old Hindu temple. The growing Islamization in Malaysia is a cause for concern to many Malaysians who follow minority religions such as Hinduism.[27]

On 11 May 2006, armed city hall officers from Kuala Lumpur forcefully demolished part of a 90-year-old suburban temple that serves more than 3,000 Hindus. The “Hindu Rights Action Force”, a coalition of several NGO’s, have protested these demolitions by lodging complaints with the Malaysian Prime Minister.[28]

According to a lawyer for the Hindu Rights Action Task Force, a Hindu temple is demolished in Malaysia once every three weeks.[29]

In 2007, Malaysian Hindu organisations protested the destruction of Hindu temples by the Malaysian regime. On 30 October 2007 the 100-year-old Maha Mariamman Temple in Padang Jawa was demolished by Malaysian authorities. Following that demolition, Works Minister and head of the Malaysian Indian Congress Samy Vellu, who is of Indian origin, said that Hindu temples built on government land were still being demolished despite his appeals to the various state chief ministers.

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Sources : Wikipedia, Picture of Batu By Aruna at ml.wikipedia – Transferred from ml.wikipedia by User:Sreejithk2000 using CommonsHelper., CC BY-SA 3.0, Link, Picture of temple By Kalaivani SomiahOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Rohingya Muslims committing crimes against infidels confirms Amnesty International

Cox’s Bazar (Bangladesh): 

Hindu residents of Chikanchari in the troubled Rakine state of Myanmar had a miraculous escape from a killer squad of Rohingya militants who had butchered Hindu inhabitants of neighbouring villages. After a long march from their village, they arrived at Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar where thousands of Hindus and Rohingya refugees had already migrated from the neighbouring country after the violence that was unleashed on 25 August last year.

The tales narrated by the inhabitants of Chikanchari have been corroborated by  Amnesty International which names the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) or Harakah al-Yakin as having carried out the carnage resulting in the death of 99 persons from Hindu villages in Myanmar’s Rakhine state.

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Are Westerners stealing Hindu Gods – Not all Hindus are Indians

The phenomenon of non-Indians adopting Hinduism is not new. However, the stories of how individuals came to the religion have not been regularly recorded. I hope to rectify that by time to time publishing interviews with those people who weren’t raised Hindu but now publicly identify as such, in the hopes of shedding some light on what drew them to Sanatana Dharma. By Mat McDermott

Click below to read their stories.

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Arrest of ISIS-inspired Texas Teen a Reminder for Temples to Review Security Plans

Washington, DC (May 3, 2018) — Yesterday a Plano, Texas teenager was arrested after he revealed his plot to carry out a mass shooting, in what is being reported as an ISIS-inspired attack. Among the targets reportedly considered by the suspect, were a school, local Hindu temple, and shopping mall. The latter was ultimately the chosen target.

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Hindus chant to ‘purify’ former Nazi concentration camps

PARIS (RNS) — There are few places on earth more haunted by evil than the memorial sites at former Nazi concentration camps. Visitors who tour their headquarters, barracks and ovens are constantly confronted with the memorials’ main lesson — “Never Again!”

A new Hindu movement based in Germany has come up with a different approach to dealing with the camps’ sinister legacy.

The group, called Bhakti Marga, organizes sessions of followers calmly chanting “om,” the sacred mantra of Hinduism, to “purify” the sites by turning their negativity into positive energy.

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NetFlix’s controversial portrayal of Rajneesh

NetFlix has made a six part documentary on Osho (Bhagwan Rajneesh) called  Wild Wild Country, and is streaming it now. The six-part series tells the story of the Rajneshees, calling him an Indian “sex cult” whose 2000-odd members moved en masse from India to rural Oregon in the 1980s.   


Almost immediately the movement ran into conflict with county residents and the state government, and a succession of legal battles concerning the ashram’s construction and continued development curtailed its success.

Photo By Samvado Gunnar Kossatz, Attribution, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3001538 

 

RSS chief warns against attempts to divide Hindus

Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohan Bhagwat has expressed his displeasure over the alleged attempts to divide the Hindu community. He criticized “the division of people following the same religion into different segments.”

 

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More Than 60 Hindu Homes gutted in Myanmar

More than 60 houses in a predominantly Hindu village in the Maungdaw district of Myanmar’s Rakhine state were gutted by fire on Thursday in an apparent act of negligence, a local community leader told RFA’s Myanmar Service.

Local Hindus, including Ni Maul, and the Myanmar government in late September said ARSA militants detained nearly 100 people from several Hindu villages in the Kha Maung Seik village tract on the same day that the attacks occurred, killed most of them, and dumped their corpses in mass graves.

The militants also forced the young Hindu women to convert to Islam and took them to a Muslim refugee camp in Bangladesh. Other Hindus fled to Bangladesh or to other parts of Rakhine state to escape the violence.

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Hindus attacked by Rohingyas in Myanmar

The attaches from international community met with local Hindu women who had been abducted by Muslim insurgents responsible for killing about 100 other Hindus during the crackdown, Hindu leader Ni Maw said.

The women said they wanted to know why the world is talking only about Muslims,” Ni Maw told RFA. “Hindus also were killed by Muslims. They want to know why people don’t talk about this, but only about the Muslims that have been killed.”

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Nyepi – Balanese Hindus celebrate Saka Calendar Hindu New Year

 Nyepi is a Hindu celebration mainly celebrated in BaliIndonesia. It is a day of silence, fasting and meditation for the Balinese. The day following Nyepi is celebrated as Hindu New Year’s Day. The same day celebrated in India as Ugadi. Nyepi is  commemorated every Isakawarsa (Saka new year) according to the Balinese calendar (in 2018, it fell on March 17).

The Hindus of Maharashtra term the same festival, observed on the same day, Gudi Padwa (Marathi: गुढी पाडवा). The Sindhis, people from Sindh, celebrate the same day as Cheti Chand, which is the beginning of their calendar year. Manipuris also celebrate their New Year as Sajibu Nongma Panba on the same day. The Hindus of Andhra Pradesh also celebrate their new year on the same day as Ugadi.

The Melasti Ritual is performed 3–4 days beforehand Nyepi. It is dedicated to Sanghyang Widhi Wasa. The ritual is performed in Pura (Balinese temple) near the sea (Pura Segara) and meant to purify Arca, Pratima, and Pralingga (sacred objects) belonging to several temples, also to acquire sacred water from the sea.The Bhuta Yajna Ritual is performed next to vanquish the negative elements and create a balance with God, Mankind, and Nature. The ritual is also meant to appease Batara Kala by Pecaruanoffering of live animal sacrifice. Around sunset the “Pengrupukan” ceremony begins in the house compounds with the noisy banging of pots and pans and bamboo tubes along with burning of dried coconut leaf torches to drive out the demons.

Most Hindu Balinese villages make ogoh-ogoh, demonic statues made of richly painted bamboo, cloth, tinsel, and styrofoam symbolizing negative elements or malevolent spirits or even characters from Hindu mythology. After the ogoh-ogoh have been paraded around the village, they are burned in the cemeteries although many are displayed in front of community halls for another month or more and sometimes even purchased by museums and collectors.

Nyepi is a day reserved for self-reflection, and as such, anything that might interfere with that purpose is restricted. The main restrictions are no lighting fires (and lights must be kept low); no working; no entertainment or pleasure; no traveling; and, for some, no talking or eating at all. The effect of these prohibitions is that Bali’s usually bustling streets and roads are empty, there is little or no noise from TVs and radios, and few signs of activity are seen even inside homes. The only people to be seen outdoors are the Pecalang, traditional security men who patrol the streets to ensure the prohibitions are being followed.

In 2018, a parade of 7,000 exhibits including a joint Narsimha sanhaar was paraded on the streets.

The Nyepi Rituals are performed as Amati Geni: No fire or light, including no electricity, Amati Karya: No working, Amati Lelunganan: No travelling and Amati Lelanguan: Fasting and no revelry/self-entertainment. The Yoga/Brata Ritual starts at 6:00 a.m. and continues to 6:00 a.m. the next day. The Ngembak Agni/Labuh Brata Ritual is performed for all Hindus to forgive each other and to welcome the new days to come. Finally, The Dharma Shanti Rituals is performed after all the Nyepi rituals are finished.

The day following Nyepi is also celebrated as New Year’s Day. On this day, the youth of Bali in the village of Sesetan in South Bali practice the ceremony of Omed-omedan or ‘The Kissing Ritual’ to celebrate the new year.

On the day after Nyepi, known as Ngembak Geni (Relighting the Fire), social activity picks up again quickly, as families and friends gather to ask forgiveness from one another, and to perform certain religious rituals together. Fires and electricity are allowed again, and cooking of food resumes.

(Source Wikipedia)