RSS chief warns against attempts to divide Hindus

Share this page on :

Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohan Bhagwat has expressed his displeasure over the alleged attempts to divide the Hindu community. He criticized “the division of people following the same religion into different segments.”

 

[Click here to read more ….]

More Than 60 Hindu Homes gutted in Myanmar

Share this page on :

More than 60 houses in a predominantly Hindu village in the Maungdaw district of Myanmar’s Rakhine state were gutted by fire on Thursday in an apparent act of negligence, a local community leader told RFA’s Myanmar Service.

Local Hindus, including Ni Maul, and the Myanmar government in late September said ARSA militants detained nearly 100 people from several Hindu villages in the Kha Maung Seik village tract on the same day that the attacks occurred, killed most of them, and dumped their corpses in mass graves.

The militants also forced the young Hindu women to convert to Islam and took them to a Muslim refugee camp in Bangladesh. Other Hindus fled to Bangladesh or to other parts of Rakhine state to escape the violence.

[Click here to read more …]

Hindus attacked by Rohingyas in Myanmar

Share this page on :

The attaches from international community met with local Hindu women who had been abducted by Muslim insurgents responsible for killing about 100 other Hindus during the crackdown, Hindu leader Ni Maw said.

The women said they wanted to know why the world is talking only about Muslims,” Ni Maw told RFA. “Hindus also were killed by Muslims. They want to know why people don’t talk about this, but only about the Muslims that have been killed.”

[Read more …] (the last but one paragraph of the news item)

Nyepi – Balanese Hindus celebrate Saka Calendar Hindu New Year

Share this page on :

 Nyepi is a Hindu celebration mainly celebrated in BaliIndonesia. It is a day of silence, fasting and meditation for the Balinese. The day following Nyepi is celebrated as Hindu New Year’s Day. The same day celebrated in India as Ugadi. Nyepi is  commemorated every Isakawarsa (Saka new year) according to the Balinese calendar (in 2018, it fell on March 17).

The Hindus of Maharashtra term the same festival, observed on the same day, Gudi Padwa (Marathi: गुढी पाडवा). The Sindhis, people from Sindh, celebrate the same day as Cheti Chand, which is the beginning of their calendar year. Manipuris also celebrate their New Year as Sajibu Nongma Panba on the same day. The Hindus of Andhra Pradesh also celebrate their new year on the same day as Ugadi.

The Melasti Ritual is performed 3–4 days beforehand Nyepi. It is dedicated to Sanghyang Widhi Wasa. The ritual is performed in Pura (Balinese temple) near the sea (Pura Segara) and meant to purify Arca, Pratima, and Pralingga (sacred objects) belonging to several temples, also to acquire sacred water from the sea.The Bhuta Yajna Ritual is performed next to vanquish the negative elements and create a balance with God, Mankind, and Nature. The ritual is also meant to appease Batara Kala by Pecaruanoffering of live animal sacrifice. Around sunset the “Pengrupukan” ceremony begins in the house compounds with the noisy banging of pots and pans and bamboo tubes along with burning of dried coconut leaf torches to drive out the demons.

Most Hindu Balinese villages make ogoh-ogoh, demonic statues made of richly painted bamboo, cloth, tinsel, and styrofoam symbolizing negative elements or malevolent spirits or even characters from Hindu mythology. After the ogoh-ogoh have been paraded around the village, they are burned in the cemeteries although many are displayed in front of community halls for another month or more and sometimes even purchased by museums and collectors.

Nyepi is a day reserved for self-reflection, and as such, anything that might interfere with that purpose is restricted. The main restrictions are no lighting fires (and lights must be kept low); no working; no entertainment or pleasure; no traveling; and, for some, no talking or eating at all. The effect of these prohibitions is that Bali’s usually bustling streets and roads are empty, there is little or no noise from TVs and radios, and few signs of activity are seen even inside homes. The only people to be seen outdoors are the Pecalang, traditional security men who patrol the streets to ensure the prohibitions are being followed.

In 2018, a parade of 7,000 exhibits including a joint Narsimha sanhaar was paraded on the streets.

The Nyepi Rituals are performed as Amati Geni: No fire or light, including no electricity, Amati Karya: No working, Amati Lelunganan: No travelling and Amati Lelanguan: Fasting and no revelry/self-entertainment. The Yoga/Brata Ritual starts at 6:00 a.m. and continues to 6:00 a.m. the next day. The Ngembak Agni/Labuh Brata Ritual is performed for all Hindus to forgive each other and to welcome the new days to come. Finally, The Dharma Shanti Rituals is performed after all the Nyepi rituals are finished.

The day following Nyepi is also celebrated as New Year’s Day. On this day, the youth of Bali in the village of Sesetan in South Bali practice the ceremony of Omed-omedan or ‘The Kissing Ritual’ to celebrate the new year.

On the day after Nyepi, known as Ngembak Geni (Relighting the Fire), social activity picks up again quickly, as families and friends gather to ask forgiveness from one another, and to perform certain religious rituals together. Fires and electricity are allowed again, and cooking of food resumes.

(Source Wikipedia)

Did Indians bring technology of Fire, Farming and tools to Australia Four Thousand Years Ago

Share this page on :

Genetic evidence suggests that just over 4 millennia ago a group of Indian travellers landed in Australia and stayed. The evidence emerged a few years ago after a group of Aboriginal men’s Y chromosomes matched with Y chromosomes typically found in Indian men.[…Read More…]

Western Australia adds a new chapter to Hindu Council

Share this page on :

A WA chapter of Hindu Council of Australia has been established on 12th March 2018.

First program will be to welcome HH Mahant Swami of BAPS by all Hindu Organisations. HCA WA chapter will lead this program to establish relation with other Hindu Organisations in WA.

Second Program will be celebration of International Yoga Day.

Following are the team members of the WA chapter.

1 Damji Koria. -Coordinator
2 Ramesh Shah.
3 Shashi limbachiya.
4 Keyur kamdar.
5 Vijay Kumar.
6 Bijukumar Prabhakaran. .
7 Amool Bhargav.
8. Mrs Sadhana Boss

Rangoli workshop at Parramasala

Share this page on :

By Shobha Deshikan

Hindu Council of Australia created a huge Rangoli of flowers at Parramasala and conducted a Rangoli making workshop. It took eight people to do the wonderful beautiful Rangoli. of vibrant and colorful flowers.  The Rangoli was very impressive. All day long, passers would stop, wonder and pictures including numerous selfies. It was thoroughly, a joyful sight to see.

SVT temple is a building of cultural significance

Share this page on :

The ‘Acharya envoys’ who propagate Indian culture

Share this page on :

Three ‘ambassadors’, whose mandate is to spread yoga and the Vedas in the U.S., explain their vision and mission

In a new initiative by the Narendra Modi government, a band of Indian officials posted to three missions in the U.S. now promote ‘Indian culture’ as part of diplomacy.

[…Read More…]

Hindu Council mourns passing away of Jagadguru Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Shankaracharya

Share this page on :

The sad passing away of Jagadguru Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Shankaracharya 1935 – 2018

The Hindu Council of Australia notes the movement of Shankaracharya Jagadguru Jayendra Saraswathi of the KanchiKamakotiPeetam (Mutt) to attain Moksha on 28 February 2018.  His calling as the 69th pontiff in 1954 was at the age of 19 years. The Mutt was established by AdiShankaracharya in the 5th Century AD.

We applaud Jagadguru Jayendra Saraswathi for leaving behind a great legacy within which he:

 

  1. Delivered religious discourses and involved himself in various spiritual and social activities. Under his guidance, the Mutt started several schools, eye clinics, hospitals and several charity initiatives such as the JanaKalyan, Jana Jagaran, a movement to “serve the people and awaken the masses.”
  2. Focussed on the uplift of Dalits and was also interested in developing healthcare and educational facilities for the people apart from spreading spiritualism. He initiated countless programmes for the downtrodden across the country. Perhaps he was the only Hindu sanyasi who had visited the most number of slums and Dalit colonies in the country. He visited the inner most parts of the Dharavi slums in Mumbai and several other slums and Dalit colonies.
  3. Was involved in both spiritual and public life and was known for the efforts for a solution in the Ajodhya and the Ram Janmabhoomi -Babri Masjid issue by engaging with stakeholders from both communities and the Government.
  4. Visited Manasarovar and Kailash in 1998 where he installed the deity of AdiShankaracharya.
  5. Established the Sri ChandrasekharendraSaraswathiViswaMahavidyalaya, a deemed university in the name of his Guru.

He will live on in the hearts and minds of millions of devotees due to his exemplary service and noblest thoughts.

The Hindu Council of Australia sends our condolences on the passing away of ShankaracharyaJagadguruPujyashri Jayendra SaraswathiShankaracharya who was at the forefront of innumerable community service initiatives. He nurtured institutions which transformed the lives of the poor and downtrodden.

Our sincerest sympathies on this sad occasion.