ISKCON Bhumi Puja

Bhoomi Puja of the new temple of ISKCON on Sunday 31st March.

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The oldest Jain temple in Pakistan

By: Wali Imran Khalil.

200 BC Greek City SirKap Pakistan is designed like Islamabad

 

SirKap is the only Greek city in the Indo Pakistan Subcontinent from the Greco-Bactrian times.

sirkap

Taxila city, which is synonymous with SirKap, has been mentioned by Greek philosopher Apollonius of Tyana of 1st Century AD as resembling Athens and Nineveh (Greek colony in present day Iraq).

sirkap

Even a Chinese traveler of early times talked of this city being strategically located at the cross roads of trade between India, China, Central Asia and Persia.

‘Bhir’ was the native city near the SriKap site that was sacked by Alexander of Macedonia in 326 BC

sirkap

Following Alexander’s (The son of Zeus’s) footsteps, Demetrius sacked the town again in 180 BC and laid foundation of SirKap city.

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Jain Temple

Demetrius styled the city on Athens.

The imposing castle of Asoka (304-232BC) still overlooks the city.

The Greek took over Asoka’s Buddhist Kingdom and melded into it.

sirkap

Indo-Greek Menander in 130 BC increased various sectors of SirKap. A Greek styled temple (Jandial) was built outside the 30 foot walls of SirKap, complete with its front Columns. Inside the walled city were syncretic temples of Jain, Sun worshipers, Hindus, Buddhists.

There was Persian Gondophares’s double headed eagle temple and a huge sun dial. The King had his royal court at the opposite end of the main boulevard.

sirkap

The city had its own water channels, drainage, wells, market place, barracks’, and residential colonies.

sirkap

One illegal excavator approached me with coins of Kushan period and said that very recently bronze statues and utensils were dug out by locals. The private archeological collection of locals is a lot more valuable than what is in the Taxila Government museum.

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SirKap was destroyed by a great earth quake in the 40 AD and then taken over by the mysterious ‘European looking’ central Asian Kushan’ (Yuezhi)

sirkap

A rival city, SirSukh was built a few kilometers away by the Kushan. SirSukh has yet to be completely excavated.

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Buddhist monasteries like Jaulian, Maura Muradu, Badalpur, etc. dotted the higher grounds around SirKap

The city was probably abandoned in the White Huns invasion of 5th century BC

sirkap

Standing in the middle of the sun dial of SirKap, it made perfect sense to me that Demetrius located this modern city on higher ground protected by the Indus & Jehlum River on both flanks, and by mountains from the North.

I always wondered where the pencil Greek nose, light eyes, blond hair and widely hedonistic traits in some Pakistani families comes from.

sirkp

Well now I know — from the Turkish Greek Border!

Do enjoy the video of Taxilla and its Surrounding Buddhist sites.

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Perth Jalaram Temple Update

PROJECT UPDATE SHREE JALARAM SANATAN MANDIR & COMMUNITY CENTRE.

JAI JALARAM,
 
We are delighted to write to you about our temple and community centre project.
 
With the blessings of Pujya Shree Jalaram Bapa, Shree Jalaram Mandal WA (Inc) of Perth, Western Australia (herein after referred to as SJMWA), is honored to let you know that we have already acquired land on which we will be embarking to construct a temple and community centre by mid-2019 and aiming to celebrate the auspicious occasion of Jalaram Jayanti 2020 at the new Mandir.
 
The temple will predominantly be a Jalaram Bapa Mandir. The project, however, is also intended to cater for the religious needs of our wider Perth Hindu Community. The temple will have other Murtis alongside that of Bapa, which murtis will include Shree Ganesh, Ram Parivar, Radha-Krishna, Shiv-Parvati, Shivling, Hanumanji and Amba Maa. In addition, the temple building design will be combined to facilitate as a community centre and for this purpose the development will comprise of modern facilities including a well-equipped commercial kitchen, community hall, classrooms and a performance stage to promote cultural activities. Please see below the artist’s impression of what the temple and community centre will look like.
 
SJMWA have already received the building permit / approval from the City Of Wanneroo for the construction of this, our very first Jalaram Mandir and Community Centre in Perth, Western Australia.
 
With the building permit in place, it means that we can now proceed to begin construction and progress towards realizing our Dream of our much awaited Mandir.
 
The building contractor tendering process is well in progress and with blessings from you all, we will be commencing construction soon.
 
With the blessings of Bapa we have been fortunate enough to raise substantial liquid funding from several devotees, which funds have been contributed to us in the form of donations and interest free loans. The interest free loans are repayable as soon as possible. The project, however, still requires further funding as detailed below.
 
Our total funding requirement for the project is approximately AUD $3,100,000.00.
 
Our total collection to date is AUD $2,930,000.00. However, this sum includes the interest free loan of AUD $680,000.00. While our immediate liquidity requirements to fully fund the project bringing it to its completion is AUD $170,000.00, we also have to collect a further AUD $680,000.00 to honorably repay the interest free loan accorded to us at the earliest. Our total requirement for funding is therefore approximately AUD $850,000.00.
 
At this stage, we have pleasure in detailing some of the following milestones that have been achieved to date:
  • The purchase price of the land of AUD $ 1,100,000.00 has been fully paid and your Mandal (SJMWA) are the proud owners of this parcel of land. A big thank you goes to you all;
  • Building permit received to allow us to commence construction;
  • We have secured interest free loans of AUD $680,000.00; and
  • The approach to our sponsorships program to raise funding is detailed below together with its achievements to date which include:
    • Major sponsorships funding the land acquisition, various parts of the building including the main hall, dining hall, kitchen, mezzanine floor, car parking and murti pratishtha;
    • Our ‘500@50for5’ subscription program, an affordable proposition. By subscribing to this program the devotee is contributing $50.00 per month for 5 years, which equates to $3,000.00 (over 5 years) without feeling the strain of laying out all the money at once. Those adopting this option will have the benefit of standing a chance to perform the highest honor of opening the doors to the Mandir with their family’s name plaque placed at the entrance in recognition of your participation. Every $50.00 subscription will go into the draw. At this stage we already have 119 participants in this program. We continue to encourage our devotees to join this program. Please click on the link to download the brochure Download Brochure
    • One off donations, an opportunity which should not be missed. While all donations are appreciated, donations over $2,000.00 will be acknowledged with a name plaque to be placed on a prominent wall of the Mandir and Community Centre.
      • $2,000.00 to $10,000.00 – Bronze Category.
      • $10,001.00 to $50,000.00 – Silver Category.
      • $50,001 and over – Gold Category.  
Other Sponsorship Opportunities:

In addition to contributing towards the temple and community centre through any of the processes detailed above you can also choose to have the honor and privilege of sponsoring the following:

  • Yajman for foundation stone laying ceremony (Bhumi Poojan); and
  • Various equipment & appliances for the Mandir and Community Centre (very many reasonable opportunities available).
Your kind & generous donations can be made via:
  •  By credit card:
             Pay via this link: Pay by credit card
  •  Direct Bank transfer:
            Shree Jalaram Mandal of Western Australia (Inc.)
            Bank: Commonwealth Bank Australia
            Address: 201 Sussex Street, Sydney, NSW 2000.
            Account Number: 12313943
            BSB Number: 066000
            Swift Code: CTBAAU2S
 
Once ready, the facility will be available for hire for various functions at a nominal charge as long as the functions will fall within the guidelines of the Mandal’s policies.  
 
For all donations & sponsorship enquiries please contact Vinesh Lakhani.
 
For more information please visit our website: www.jalarambapa.com.au
 
Thanking you & may BAPA always shower his blessings upon you all.
 
 
Kind Regards
Vinesh Lakhani
Chairman & Temple Project Coordinator
On behalf of : The Trustees & the Managing Committee of Shree Jalaram Mandal WA (Inc.)
(T) + 61 405 323 571
(E) chairman@jalarambapa.com.au

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Bangladesh Govt to develop 1,812 Hindu establishments

During the Liberation War in 1971, Pakistan army men destroyed many temples in different parts of the country, it added. “Among other problems, preservation of Hindu culture and temples is a major issue,” proposal said.

The government is going to develop and renovate 1,812 Hindu temples and religious establishments across the country. The Tk 228.69-crore project will be placed today at the Executive Committee of the National Economic Council (Ecnec) meeting, a Planning Ministry official said. “Once the project is implemented, members of the […]

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Scores of devotees visit Nepal’s Pashupatinath temple on Mahashivaratri

Devotees at Pashupatinath Temple, Kathmandu (Nepal) Kathmandu [ Nepal ], Mar 4 (ANI): Thousands of devotees thronged Pashupatinath temple here on Monday on the occasion of Mahashivaratri. The Indian Ambassador also visited the Pashupatinath temple to offer prayers. The Pashupati Area Development Trust (PADT) is expecting about one million […]

Scores of devotees visit Nepal\'s Pashupatinath temple on Mahashivaratri

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Book Review – Flight of Deities and Rebirth of Temples

This book ought to be part of every Indian’s library, not in order to embarrass present-day Muslims who had nothing to do with the desecration of temples, but as a reminder of the damage done to truth by Left-wing historians.

The cover of Flight of Deities and Rebirth of Temples: Episodes from Indian History by Meenakshi Jain, right.  […]

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Building a new temple based on Agama Sastra in Gungahlin District, Canberra

By: Dr Krishna Nadimpalli, Hindu Canberra Mandir.

The Canberra Hindu Mandir (CHM) follows agama shastra architecture under the guidance of Sri Venkateswara Vedic University, Tirupati, India.  CHM has been registered in 2014 to provide a place of worship for the Hindu practicing residents of Gungahlin region in Canberra.

Australian Capital Territory (ACT) has offered 6000 sq.m land located at Hoffman Street, Moncreiff, ACT 2914. In order to get the title of the land, government has asked CHM to demonstrate the financial viability of the community to construct the temple before June 2019.

The proposed temple consists of a complex of Shrines dedicated to Shiva Parivar, Vishnu Incarnations and Guru. There is a provision for a Event/Utsav Hall and a vegetarian cafe.

Devotees contributions and support will help us build a temple for all Hindu Practitioners in Gungahlin. 

 Crowdfunding – Any person can donate the funds through https://www.gofundme.com/canberra-hindu-mandir.  Please forward this link to your friends in local and overseas.  

Further CHM offers many services for the devotees and donors including Foundation Bricks, Foundation Pooja, Sponsor Deities, Sponsor Chants and Building Donation (Tax Free for Australians).   More details of the following services can be found at https://www.hindumandir.org.au/fundraising 

 

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Desecrating Hindu temples by tolerant religion becoming a global phenomena

Another Hindu temple has been vandalized, this time in Louisville, America.

The crime signatures are very similar to Bhartiye Mandir, Reagents Park, Sydney, Australia vandalization event that took place a few months back. There was an outpouring of anger and disgust by Australians including from those sharing the religion of the vandals. Local mayor and council reacted swiftly to help clean up. All major political party leaders condemned the incident helping to heal the wounds and preserve unity and cohesiveness of multicultural Australia. You can read about the Australian incident by clicking here. The Australian Hindu leaders and community did not publicize the perpetrators religious persuation to avoid affecting harmony among Australians.

The crime in America seems to show the hallmark of same fundamentalist religious extremism as was in the Australian incident.

Hindu Council of Australia condemns the vandalisation of Hindu temples and calls upon other religious leaders and all Australians to condemn this incident.

Please register your protest here.


Hate Crime: Hindu Temple Vandalised In US’s Louisville; “Jesus Is All Mighty”, “Jesus Is Lord” Messages Posted On Walls

Posted: 31 Jan 2019 04:27 AM PST

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In a hate crime, a Hindu temple has been vandalised in the US state of Kentucky by miscreants who sprayed black paint on the deity and left a knife stabbed into a chair in the main hall.

The incident happened between Sunday night and Tuesday morning at the Swaminarayan Temple in the Louisville city.

According to local media report, vandalism resulted in deity image sprayed with black paint, broken windows, walls spray-painted with inappropriate messages and graffiti. A knife was stabbed in the chair, and cabinets were emptied. The incident has sent shock waves through the Indian-American community in Louisville Kentucky.

Authorities are investigating the incident as a hate crime. Condemning the incident of vandalism, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer called upon the city residents to stand up against this hatred.

“Anytime we see hatred or bigotry we will stand against it. The cowards who did this have only given our community more fuel and determination to embrace compassion, understanding, and each other,” Fischer said as he visited the vandalised temple Wednesday.

“Sometime between the end of services at the Swaminarayan Temple on Bardstown Road on Sunday and the time a repairman arrived on Tuesday morning, vandals broke into a window and vandalised spots throughout the building,” he said. The vandalism of this temple, Fischer said is another example of the work “we still have to do as a city and a nation to make sure we live to our ideals of equality, of a country where everyone is treated with the respect we all deserve.” Fischer said that the vandals wrote “repugnant messages of hate.” “Regardless of what religion you are, this should not happen,” Raj Patel from the Swaminarayan temple said. “We come here to worship. We should not have to turn our backs to see who is behind us, but we should be happy to come here and worship in peace,” he added.

Describing the desecration as “heartbreaking”, Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad told reporters that the police will provide additional security to the temple.

“What I’m here to do today is to assure everyone that attends this temple that we will do our best to find and hold accountable the person or persons who committed this vandalism and this hate crime,” Conrad said.

Kentucky State Representative Nima Kulkarni, the first Indian-American elected to the Kentucky General Assembly, said the vandalism was an “act of intimidation designed to weaken our faith and community”. There has been a number of such incidents across the US in previous years. In April 2015, a Hindu temple in north Texas has been vandalised with nasty images spray-painted on its walls.

In February 2015, Hindu temples in Kent and the Seattle Metropolitan area were also vandalised.

HinduStan Times

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Menstruation is Far From Taboo in Hinduism

By: Sunila Goray Raj

(edited by : Surinder Jain)

Menstruation is Far From Taboo in Hinduism.
 
There is so much to be said about it all – but here I only want to focus on the leftist’s latest favorite topic : Menstruation.
 
A survey conducted in USA in 1981 showed that a substantial majority of U.S. adults and adolescents believed that it is socially unacceptable to discuss menstruation, especially in mixed company. Many believed that it is unacceptable to discuss menstruation even within the family.[66] Studies in the early 1980s showed that nearly all girls in the United States believed that girls should not talk about menstruation with boys, while more than one-third of girls did not believe it appropriate to discuss menstruation with their father.[67]
 
In Hindu culture, a girl who achieved menarche, or her first period, was feted, and pampered at a ceremony where family and close friends gathered and lavished gifts on her. The girl would be bathed in fragrant water after applying oil, turmeric etc. she would be bedecked in fine clothes, flowers and ornaments – and her feet would be washed. This is because Hinduism celebrates, and does not abhor menstruation. The Shakti philosophy upholds it as a gift which is responsible for creation of life.
 
 

Devotees singing in front of Kamakhya temple

 
The Kamakhya Temple in Assam celebrates the annual menstruation of the Goddess – and there is no idol there, just a structure that resembles the yoni, or the female symbol of creation.The Chengannur Temple in Kerala has a tradition of bathing the idol in a grand ceremony after her ‘period’ is over. According to the Kalika Purana, Kamakhya Temple denotes the spot where Sati used to retire in secret to satisfy her amour with Shiva, and it was also the place where her yoni (genital) fell after Shiva danced with the corpse of Sati.[41] It mentions Kamakhya as one of four primary shakti peethas: the others being the Vimala Temple within the Jagannath Temple complex in Puri, Odisha; Tara Tarini) Sthana Khanda (Breasts), near Brahmapur, Odisha, and Dakhina Kalika in Kalighat, Kolkata, in the state of West Bengal, originated from the limbs of the Corpse of Mata Sati. 
 
The temple remains closed for three days during the Ambubachi mela[2][3] for it is believed that mother earth becomes unclean for three days like the traditional women’s menstrual seclusion. During these three days some restrictions are observed by the devotees like not cooking, not performing puja or reading holy books, no farming etc.[2] After three days devi Kamakhya is bathed and other rituals are performed to ensure that the devi retrieves her purity.[3] Then the doors of the temple are reopened[2][3][4] and prasad is distributed.[2][4] On the fourth day the devotees are allowed to enter the temple and worship devi Kamakhya.
 
Many religions have menstruation-related traditions, for example: Islam prohibits sexual contact with women during menstruation in the 2nd chapter of the Quran. In Judaism, a woman during menstruation is called Niddah and may be banned from certain actions. Western civilization, which has been predominantly Christian, has a history of menstrual taboos. [source: wikipedia] Some Christian denominations, including many authorities of the Eastern Orthodox Church and some parts of the Oriental Orthodox Church advise women not to receive communion during their menstrual period.[34] In certain branches of Japanese Buddhism, menstruating women are banned from attending temples.[37] In Japan, the religion of Shinto, the Kami, the spirits they worship, would not grant wishes if you had traces of blood, dirt, or death on you. In some portions of South Asia, there is a menstrual taboo, with it frequently being considered impure. Restrictions on movement, behaviour and eating are frequently placed.[57] The Yurok in North America practiced menstrual seclusion. Yurok women used a small hut near the main house.[65]
 
BONUS FACT: Hinduism is the only mainstream religion which worships God in the female form – for wealth (Lakshmi), education (saraswati), and courage too (Durga) – we worship Goddesses. What greater women empowerment can there be? To accuse Hinduism of gender disparity is beyond ridiculous!
 
An orchestrated effort is being made, or should I say, has been made for several years now, to denigrate Hindu customs and culture. In the whole uproar over Sabarimala, the issue being tom-tommed by pseudo liberals is Women’s rights – gender equality, and especially the whole taboo surrounding menstruation – and all of it is nothing but a distortion, and concoction, where the narrative is being twisted to suit the agenda of certain vested interests.
 
In the West, media houses like the BBC and CNN are upholding Kanakadurga and Bindu, who pretended to be transgenders, and were whisked into Sabarimala in ambulances with the support of plains clothes cops, as ‘defenders of women’s rights’.
I do not know if I should shake my head, or tear my hair out in frustration.
 
With the advent of western education, especially missionary education, Hindus were made to feel that this whole ceremony is horrendous – how can you announce that your daughter has now started menstruating, what an embarrassment, how orthodox, what a shameful ritual, how backward – these were the things we were told. And instead of trying to resist, and make others understand what this ceremony meant, and its deep significance – we (me included) hung our heads in shame, relented, and agreed with them.
 
Today hardly anybody performs this ceremony for their daughters, because we were taught by those who came from outside that it is taboo, and shameful. We also joined the bandwagon which proclaimed menstruation to be ‘filthy’.
 
Irony is that today, those very people who first advocated the stopping of ‘shameful and orthodox’ rituals of celebrating menstruation, are mocking Hindus about women entering Sabarimala and turning it into a ‘menstruation taboo’ issue, whereas clearly, it is not that at all.
Today, those very same people are trying to prove themselves as modern and as the harbinger of women’s rights and equality by conducting a festival dedicated to menstruation – styled ‘Aarpo Aarthavam’. It is laughable! The hypocrisy is just unbelievable.
 
So please stop trying to fool gullible people, because there are still many of us who know the truth.

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Tirta Gangga in Bali

Bali is an island in Indonesia and has largely native Hindu population. A water garden was built in Bali by Dr Anak Agung Made Djelantik in the year 1948 and named after the Hindu holy river Ganga.

Tirta Gangga – Bali

Tirta Gangga is a former royal palace in eastern Bali, Indonesia, about 5 kilometres from Karangasem, near Abang. It is noted for its water palace, owned by Karangasem Royal.

The primary draw in this area for visitors is the Tirta Gangga water palace, a lovely maze of pools and fountains surround by a lush garden and stone carvings and statues. The one hectare complex was built in 1946 by the late King of Karangsem but was destroyed almost entirely by the eruption of nearby Mount Agung in 1963. It has been lovingly re-built and restored and has an air of authentic royal magnificence. The centrepiece of the palace is an eleven tiered fountain, and there are many beautiful carvings and statues adorning the gardens.

Lempuyang Temple (Pura Lempuyang Luhur) is about 10 km east of Tirtagangga on the slopes of Mount Lempuyang. This is one of the key nine directional temples on the island. Park in the car park and walk up the steps to the temple. The lower temple is always open but the upper temple (at the top of the dragon staircases) is often locked, so it is best to go with a Balinese driver who will usually be able to arrange for the temple priest to open it up for you. It’s situated high up a mountain and there are magnificent sunset views at dusk.

Taman Ujung or Taman Sukasada (Sukasada Park) is 5 kilometers to the southeast of Karangasem (Amlapura), another water palace built by the predecessor of the King who constructed Tirta Gangga. It was largely destroyed by the eruption of Mount Agung in 1963, damaged again by an earthquake in 1979, and has not been restored on the same scale as Tirta Gangga. 

Holy Water

The water from one of the natural springs of Tirtagangga has always been regarded as holy. It is used for religious ceremonies in the temples in the area until today. Tirta means blessed water, gangga came from Ganges, the holy river in India. The holy water is required for ceremonies of the temples in the surrounding as far as Tirtagangga can be reached by foot.

History

Dr. Anak Agung Made Djelantik (1919 – 2007) (source : http://www.tirtagangga.nl/)

After a childhood in the puri (palace) of Karangasem, my father was educated in Java and Holland. Completing his medical study during the turbulence 2nd world war, he worked from 1948 as a doctor and chief medical officer in various parts of Indonesia. From 1969 he was connected to the World Health Organisation, taking postings in Iraq, Somalia and Afghanistan. From 1979 he continued his passion for public health, culture and arts, especially painting, in Bali.

Construction (An account by Dr Anak’s son Widoere Djelantik)

In 1948 my grandfather built a watergarden complex which he gave the name Tirtagangga.

Apart from his personal interest, my grandfather built Tirtagangga for 2 main reasons:

– To ensure and improve the holiness of a holy place;

– To create a place of contemplation, rest and joy for every one, the local people as well as the domestic and foreign visitors.

These are still and will always be the purposes of the garden.

The religious function of the spring, the cool climate and the scenic beauty of the surrounding hills inspired him to build recreational water gardens for himself and his people. Making watergardens of all sorts had always been his hobby. He not only did all the designing himself, but he also used to work together with his labourers, digging in the ground, standing knee deep in the water, dirty with mud. It was always a great surprise for the visitors after some time looking at the work in progress to discover the tiny figure of the Raja among the workers. People liked it and it was one of his many charming traits.

The construction of the water gardens had been severe interrupted by the eruption of the Mount Agung which lasted from February to September, 1963. A series of eruptions occurred during those months. Lava and hot ash from the mountains had killed all vegetation. The grounds had not been affected by the lava flows which found their way along the valleys to the east and to the west of the complex. However, what had been built thus far was for the greater part destroyed by earthquakes of more and less severity during all those months. In addition to the natural disaster vandalism done by people who fled their villages and had no food had taken its heavy toll. The Raja family took refuge to saver place on the island. Tirtagangga was abandoned and fell pray to looting. Everything that could be taken away and sold such as furniture, windows, tiles, pipes, chinese porcelain, flower pots, statues and so on disappeared in the course of time.

When after about ten months the calamity was over the Raja returned, only to find the beautiful garden in ruins. There was no money for rebuilding the ponds and structures. With the introduction of the Land Reform Bill the Rajas, like all the other great land owners, had lost their means for extravagant undertakings. The rehabilitation of Tirtagangga could only be done in a very frugal and haphazard manner.

Since 1979, after a long duty period abroad, my father supervised the rehabilitation of the garden. With a slight increase of the entrance fees in 1985 a little bit could be accomplished. With the help of the local government the upper swimming pool was rehabilitated. Little by little the watergardens are coming into a better shape.

As my father became older, he was less capable in supervising the garden. In the nineties deterioration started again as very little maintenance was executed. During a walk in 1999, while overwhelmed by the majestic Banyan tree of the garden, I received a vision to transform the distressing state into the one of splendour. This vision was the reason why I found the foundation, drawn up the masterplan, build this website, seek for donation, incorporated the Balinese Hinduism-Buddhism concept in the complex, design the buildings, bridges, sculptures and so on to be able to restore the garden until the present shape.

WHO IS WHO

  Anak Agung Anglurah Ketut Karangasem (1887 – 1966)

My grandfather, the last Raja of Karangasem, succeeded his uncle, Gusti Gede Djelantik in 1908 as stedehouder (local ruler under the Dutch colonisation). A born architect and lecturer, he build several watergardens and wrote many philosophical, ethical and religious notes, hymns and poems in the Indonesian and Balinese languages.

As a child I found him most happy when sitting on his verandah or walking around enjoying the watergarden in a modest sarong, chewing his sirih.

   
  Dr. Anak Agung Made Djelantik (1919 – 2007)

After a childhood in the puri (palace) of Karangasem, my father was educated in Java and Holland. Completing his medical study during the turbulence 2nd world war, he worked from 1948 as a doctor and chief medical officer in various parts of Indonesia. From 1969 he was connected to the World Health Organisation, taking postings in Iraq, Somalia and Afghanistan. From 1979 he continued his passion for public health, culture and arts, especially painting, in Bali.

My father wrote several books, including an autobiography, The Birthmark (Periplus, 1997, isbn 9625931651). The autobiography is an excellent source to know more about the background of the watergarden.

   
  Widoere Djelantik (1953)

My full name is Ir. Anak Agung Gede Dharma Widoere Djelantik MMIT. I spend most of my childhood in Denpasar, Bali. In 1971 I went to Holland, where I completed studies in architecture, fine arts and information technology. After posted abroad as development engineer in Mali, Botswana and the Maldives between 1979 and 1986, I worked as information analist for the municipal of Gouda until 1998. From then until today I am connected as senior adviser to Staatsbosbeheer, the Dutch forestry department.

From childhood, the watergarden has always been an exciting place to me. With my sisters and other children I jumped in and out the water the whole day. In between the swims there were endless possibilities to play, such as building ships, daming the open gutters, playing in the rice fields or in the hills in the surrounding.

 

  Agung Bagus (1971)

Born and grown up outside Bali, my cousin Ir. Anak Agung Bagus Raka Barahyangwangsa obtained his master degree for architecture in Jakarta in 1995. Between 1979 and 1982 he lived in several south American countries, where his father served as ambassador for Indonesia. Before he and his family moved back to Amlapura in 2000, Agung Bagus has gained experience as architect and job captain in large projects such as Plaza Indonesia and Menara Jakarta.

   
  Surya Djelantik (1950)

Like me, my sister Anak Agung Ayu Suryawati Djelantik spend most of her childhood in Denpasar, Bali. After completion of her hotel-management school in Holland in 1973, she worked at several Indonesian leading hotels, such as Kartika Plaza in Jakarta, Nusa Dua Beach and Sheraton Nusa Indah in Bali.

 

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