Katas Raj Hanuman Temple, Kalar Kahar, Pakistan

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Kalyan Das The Hindu Temple of Compassion in Rawalpindi-2

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Hindu Temples ( Mandirs) of Rawalpindi, Pakistan – 1

Four temples are located in a narrow lane that runs between Sarafa bazaar and Lunda bazaar. All four are at a walking distance, and quite similar in appearance. The entrance to this lane from the Sarafa bazar road is barely a meter wide. Knowing that pre-partition Hindus dominated trade in Rawalpindi, finding Hindu remnants in Bohar, Lunda, and Sarafa bazars is no surprise.

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Hindu Temples Of Lal Kurti Bazaar, Rawalpindi Pakistan

The most well preserved of the three Hindu temples in the old Lal-Kurti Bazar is now a private property of a well-connected Muslim migrant family and is closed to the public. It is just a few yards from the Lal Kurti main square. Both Hindus and Sikh used to worship in the place during British times. This temple is in the courtyard of an old Hindu mansion. The place had a watering-well and the sacred Banyan tree.

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In Balochistan, Hindus Under Threat in the Face of State Indifference

The Wire – Karachi (Pakistan): Minorities face threats and have been under attack in Balochistan, the southwestern province of Pakistan. The province is struggling with an insurgency and Christians, Shias, Hazaras and Hindus are unsafe.

Recently, reports claimed that Christian and Hazara communities have been targeted by terrorist groups. Jalila Haider, an activist from the Hazara community, went on a hunger strike demanding protection for the Hazara community. “More Hazaras have been murdered than rump sheep in Quetta,” she said, speaking to BBC Urdu.

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Pakistan seals Hindu deities, may renovate the temple

There are many Hindu temples in Pakistan most of them in disarray, their land under threat of encroachment from selfish commercial interests or from terrorists.

A small Krishna temple was built by Kanji Mal and Ujagar Mal Ram Rachpal in 1897 to serve people in nearby areas. However, after partition and creation of a Muslim Pakistan in 1947, the street temple in Saddar became the only place of worship for Rawalpindi’s Hindus. The temple was reopened after partition in 1949; it was operated by local Hindus before being handed over to the Evacuee Trust Property Board (ETPB) in 1970.

Until the 1980s, Hindu diplomats living in Islamabad visited the temple to pray. Local Hindus have said the temple’s area should be expanded. Jag Mohan Arora said the temple courtyard, which can only accommodate 100 or so people, should be expanded, and shops next to the temple that the ETPB has leased to local traders should be retrieved to expand the front of the building.

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(acknowledgements: By Bilalakhtar148 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49331813)

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Hindu brothers killed in a Hindu majority town in Pakistan

courtesy New York Times.

In Mithi, Hindus make up about 85 percent of the population. Hindus being in such a large majority, both Hindus and Muslims have long lived peacefully. However, a steady influx of “outsiders” — Muslim extremist parties and sectarian groups have been moving into the area and other parts of the Sindh Province, as they seek new havens and erode the tolerance the town is famous for.This is so familiar to the ways of 1947 when peace loving villagers were torn apart by outside extremists and resulting religious violence.

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Pakistani Hindu parents allege their daughter forced to convert to Islam

In the predawn darkness on Feb. 24, Rinkel Kumari, a 19-year-old student from a Hindu family, disappeared from her home in Mirpur Mathelo, a small village off a busy highway in Sindh Province. Hours later, she resurfaced 12 miles away, at the home of a prominent Muslim cleric who phoned her parents with news that distressed them: Their daughter wished to convert to Islam, he said. Their protests were futile. By sunset, Ms. Kumari had become a Muslim, married a young Muslim man, and changed her name to Faryal Bibi. Sulachany Devi and Nand Lal are pleading for the return of their daughter, Rinkel Kumari. Ms. Kumari’s family says her marriage and conversion were done at gunpoint.

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Pakistan elects a Hindu woman senator, second time in its history

Compare that with how many Muslim women have been elected in India since 1947. Krishna Kumari Kohli’s election represents a major milestone for women and minority rights in Pakistan. Ms. Kumari’s victory was a rare bit of good news for the country’s Hindu minority.

Pakistan has a dismal record over the treatment of vulnerable religious minorities. Most live in fear of their lives and property amid an increase in religious intolerance in recent years, along with violence and deadly assaults. Hindus, who make up 4 percent of the country’s population of approximately 200 million people, mostly live in southern Sindh Province. In recent years, they have increasingly complained of forced conversions to Islam carried out by hard-line Islamists.

The local Hindu community has suffered persecution at the hands of radical Islamists, with many women forcibly converted to be married off to Muslims. The state’s acquiescence to groups behind kidnappings, killings and desecration of Hindu temples, most notably in Sindh, has meant that Hindus have been fleeing Pakistan – often to find refuge in India.

According to Senator Ramesh Kumar, a member of the Pakistan Muslim League (Nawaz), “around 5,000 Hindus leave Pakistan every year” because of the persecution. Dev says the Kohli community is marginalized even among the Hindus. “This is why a Kohli woman joining the Senate is a positive development. For we have had parliamentarians from the Meghwar community, but never Kohlis,” he said.

Ms. Kumari said her aims as a senator would be to work toward improving the lives of religious minorities and the people of Tharparkar, which has been troubled by drought, unemployment and a lack of development.

Hindus have previously been elected to Parliament, both in the lower and upper houses. Two male Hindus from the Dalit caste have served in the Senate, both members of the Pakistan Peoples Party. 

Kohli joined the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) as a social activist to campaign for the rights of marginalised communities in the Thar region. She also campaigns for women’s rights, against bonded labour, and against sexual harassment in the workplace.[4] Kolhi also actively participated and worked for the rights of downtrodden people of marginalised communities living in Thar and other areas.

She is from the family of the valiant freedom fighter Rooplo Kolhi, who had waged a war against the invading British colonialist forces when they had attacked Sindh from Nagarparkar side in 1857. Subsequently, he was arrested and hanged by the Britishers on August 22, 1858.

Kohli was born on 1 February 1979[2] to a poor family hailing from a village in Nagarparkar.[3] When she was a child and a student of grade three, she and her family were held captive for three years as bonded labourers in a private jail allegedly owned by a landlord in Umerkot District.[4][3] They were only released after a police raid on their employer’s land. She received her early education initially from Umerkot district and then from Mirpurkhas District.[2]

She got married at the age of 16 in 1994 while she was studying in grade nine.[2] She continued her education after her marriage and in 2013 earned a master’s degree in Sociology from the University of Sindh.[3]

In 2007, she attended the third Mehergarh Human Rights Youth Leadership Training Camp in Islamabad in which she studied the government of Pakistan, international migration, strategic planning and learned about the tools that could be used to create social change.[2]

(Source:Wikipedia)

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