Voilence during shifting of Hindu temple in Malaysia

After Islamic insult on Hindu temple in Malaysia, Violence breaks out

Surya Jeya Kumar| Selangor : Vehicles were set ablaze when violence broke out near the Seafield Sri Maha Mariamman temple in Selangor’s Subang Jaya  in the wee hours of Monday (Nov 26).

The fight between two groups was sparked by a disagreement over the relocation of the Hindu temple, Subang Jaya district police said in a Facebook post.

Hindu devotees were reportedly protesting the relocation of the 100-year-old Hindu house of worship when they were attacked by another group of Muslim people, news portal Malaysiakini said.

“Eighteen cars and two motorcycles were torched in the incident. A police patrol car was also damaged by stones thrown during the incident,” said Selangor police chief Mazlan Mansor.

“About 50 men were in the compound of the temple and a group of men was outside. They traded insults that led to the riot,” he added.

In a Malaysiakini video, it is clearly seen that Jihadi people came out in streets with Allha-o-Akbar slogans to chase the Hindus to stranded them from their demand to save the dignity of the 100 years old Sri Maha Mariamman temple in the seafield area of Selangor’s Subang Jaya. The Allaho-ho-Akbar people were telling not to make trouble in their speech, but they were set to create violence against Hindu people connected with Sri Maha Mariamman temple

Police has taken control of that area tough came a little bit late, as local people reported.

Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Senator P. Waytha Moorthy has appealed to all Malaysians to stay calm over the scuffle at a Hindu temple in USJ25 early today within the jurisdiction of UEP (United Estate Projects) Subang Jaya.

He said upon receiving various Facebook postings and video recordings on the incident at the Sri Maha Mariamman Temple, he contacted Deputy Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Noor Rashid Ibrahim, Bernama reports.

“The minister has raised grave concern of the community on the affray which appears to be a threat to the breach of peace and peaceful co-existence of our multi-racial and multi-religious society as well as freedom of religion,“ said a statement issued by the Office of the Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department.

The statement said the Deputy IGP has promised that a thorough investigation would be conducted on the incident.

In SHAH ALAM, Selangor Mentri (Minister) Besar Amirudin Shari said the matter should be left to the police to investigate as it involved a crime, AMAR SHAH MOHSEN reports.

“It is best that we give our full trust to the police to investigate the motive behind the attack and what actually transpired.

“This involves crime and as such, I advise that everyone refrain from making statements, or take actions, that can lead to unwanted scenarios,“ he told reporters at the lobby of the Selangor state legislative assembly, here, today.

In GEORGE TOWN, Penang Deputy Chief Minister II Dr P. Ramasamy called on the local authorities and developers throughout the country to find ways to ensure that their development projects can co-exist with Hindu temples, IAN MCINTYRE reports.

Ramasamy, who is DAP central executive committee member, said that there needs to be a better way to settle disputes over the locations for places of worship, especially if the place of worship was established earlier than the proposed development project, he said in an interview.

Ramasamy, who plans to visit the site of the unrest, said the Pakatan Harapan government needs to make it a point to ensure that the co-existence of places of worship with new projects becomes a working policy.

“I am aghast over the incident, especially coming under the Pakatan tenure. We need to offer a solution to all parties,“ he said.

Meanwhile, the Malaysian Hindu Sangam (MHS) called upon the Hindu community to remain calm and not to retaliate with violence.

Its president Datuk R. S. Mohan Shan condemned the violence and urged Hindus, temples and Hindu non-governmental organisations to lodge police reports nationwide.

The Malaysian Consultative Council of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Sikhism and Taoism (MCCBCHST) also echoed Mohan’s sentiment and condemned the attack.

“The MCCBCHST calls upon the police to leave no stones unturned in bringing to justice all those who were involved in this ugly incident.

“Such acts of violence must never be condoned. A temple is a house of worship and its sanctity must be maintained at all times.”

A source in MCCBCHST says,the Indian Jihadi Preacher Zakir Naik,  now in Malaysia, is radicalizing the Malay Muslims youth against the Hindus residing there. Zakir Naik has established an internal connection with many Muslim Ministers, Politicians, Administrators and Police Officials in Malaysia, who treat Hindu Citizens of Malaysia as second class citizens.

Source : Hindu Existence

After Islamic insult on Hindu temple in Malaysia, Violence breaks out

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Diwali Tradition – by French Association of Singapore

By: Fayrouz Yataghane.

Deepavali illuminates us from September 29th to
November 6th


Deepavali also named Divali or Diwali is one of the most
important cele-bration for the Hindu community. It is
celebrated for three consecutive days with the main day
being on November 6th this year. In Singapore preparations
have started end of September in Little India but not only
there…
Deepavali is celebrating the successful fight of Rama,
considered in Hinduism an avatar of Vishnu God, against
Ravana, the demon king. Deepavali refers to the light of
the “dip”, a traditional oil lamp, that people who were
living in Ayodhya town would have placed “in rows”
for welcoming Rama’s return. That is the reason why,
according to the tradition, Indian families illuminate their
houses and streets for Deepavali.

Deepavali all over the world

Deepavali is celebrated by many generations in India and
by Hindu peo-ple all over the world, as confirms Snehal
Thaker, president of the Hindu Council of Australia – HCA.
This organization, which was established in 1998, aims to
unite the Hindu community in Australia and to promote
its culture and tradition. “The HCA has organized the
Deepavali Festival in Australia each year for the last twenty
years. In 2017, over 6000 people from different ethnic
background and ages gathered to attend the celebration.
A success due to the joined efforts of the Hindu
representatives of eight countries: India, Nepal, Bhutan,
Fiji, Bangladesh, Tibet, Indonesia and of course, Australia.”
“This year again, the HCA will organise the Festival. Due
to the large success of the Festival in the past, this year it
will take place at the Adelaide Show Grounds, to respond
to the at-tendees’ expectations in terms of space and
comfort. All is planned to welcome them, and to protect
them against the rain!” says Snehal Thak-er.

Deepavali through the generations

 

Shaheen Sivji

Shaheen Shivji is an Indian woman. She has a fifteenmonth-
old daughter and she is currently working part time
at the French Alliance of Singa-pore. She studied French at
University, back in India, and she continues to learn French
here in Singapore, where she moved to, with her husband
two years ago.
Shaheen doesn’t celebrate Deepavali for religious reasons
because she is not Hindu but Muslim. However, she
explains that this celebration is gathering Indians from all
religions. “Above the myth and the religion, Deepavali
symbolizes the Light. Lights from many different sources
and colour are flashing happily in our streets during the
Festival. For children, this period is really very exciting and
synonym of holidays and sweets! During those three days,
we prepare both savoury and sweet food to of-fer them to
our guests, family and friends. After the prayers, we launch
the fireworks, and everybody can try to make Rangoli, a
drawing de-signed with coloured powders. The women
are wearing a special Sari, particularly well decorated,
and for the men, trousers with a tunic, that depending of
its style, providing some information about the social position
of the person.”
During this period, respect and goodwill are the values
that are highlight-ed: “This moment is a large gathering for
all people, not only family”, says Shaheen.

Sujatha Sundaram is Indian and Hindu. She has been living
in Singapore since 2010. She was born in South India and
lived in North India.

Sujatha Sundram

Sujatha celebrates Deepavali each year as she was doing
back in India. According to her, it is the most important
Festival for Hindus: “We cele-brate it in every place in India,
each region in its own way: in the South, we celebrate it
in the morning, in the North, it is usually in the evening. But
there are also common points: we decorate the house, we
buy new clothes and gold jewellery. We draw Rangoli on
the floor at the entrance of our house, we make cakes for
friends and family, who are invited or visited. And in the
evening, we switch on the lights around the house and
fireworks are launched everywhere! In the past, in India,
we were a big family, living very close to each other. Now
that we are a bit more dis-persed, that event is more social
than religious. The children are still waiting for Deepavali
with great anticipation. They appreciate the conviv-iality
and the festive ambiance and of course the gifts!”

Deepavali through the flavours

Manjunath Mural

La Gazette pushed the doors of the Michelin Star Restaurant
“The Song of In-dia” to meet its famous chef, Manjunath
Mural. He offers to share the Deepavali delights through a
special menu, as a trip across India…

What do you propose for Deepavali celebration?

I’ve prepared a 4-course set menu specially for the
occasion. As per our mis-sion “Journey Through India”, the
menu highlights the specialities of each region all over India –
from North, South, East to West. Of course, no cel-ebration
is complete without enjoying the traditional Indian Mithai
sweets which are a symbol of goodwill and friendship.
Where does the celebration of Deepavali come from?
The origin of the Deepavali festival most likely started out as
a fusion of har-vest festivals across ancient India.

How does the Indian/Hindu community usually celebrate
Deepavali?

Deepavali, or Diwali symbolises light triumphing over
darkness. We Indians of-ten celebrate by decorating our
homes and offices with bright lights and can-dles and
setting off fireworks displays. Of course, we also have our
Mithai sweets that we will give to our friends and family.

What do you aim to share with people through your
cooking?

My philosophy has always been to present a Journey
Through India, that is why the food served at The Song of
India is inspired by traditional recipes from North, South,
East and West India.

Could you tell us about your personal experience as a
chef? And the way that has lead you to the cooking?

During my training in India, I had the chance to meet and
learn from these two chefs both women were originally
from Thailand. While observing them, I was so impressed
with their passion for food and the respect they earned
from the guests and team. It made me realise that this
profession is full of respect and passion and it was at

that moment that I decided to become a chef. My guests are
my motivation. I’m always inspired to create new exciting
dishes that will keep them coming back for more.
Restaurant: The Song of India: 33 Scotts Road 228226
www.thesongofindia.com
Special Deepavali menu available from 3rd to 10th of
November 2018

Deepavali in Singapore

Deepavali Festival in Singapore will mainly take place
in Little India from September 29th to November 6th with
many highlights that should not be missed!
Find more information on the website https://www.littleindia.
com.sg, in-viting you to live the Deepavali experience.
“Head to Little India where the streets are transformed
into a fantasyland of colourful arches and stunning lights.
Wander through the bazaars with their glittering gold and
gems, exquisitely embroidered saris and gleam-ing golden
oil lamps. Inhale the scent of marigolds, roses and jasmine,
thickly braided into lush floral garlands mingling with the
perfume of sweet incense and the fragrance of Indian
spices and Ayurvedic mas-sage oils …”
Let’s just admit it: we are tempted!

Fayrouz Yataghane

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Exhibition on Vietnam Hindu Cham Brahman Community Opens

An exhibition featuring the 2018 Kate Festival, the most important annual celebration of the ethnic Cham Brahman community, opened in the central province of Ninh Thuan on October 8.

On the occasion, Mukha Linga and Po Long Girai statues, along with Nandin, Patil, and Banal sacred bulls, costumes, and musical instruments were introduced to the public, contributing to maintaining, preserving, and upholding values of national cultural heritage. 

Le Xuan Loi, Director of the Research Centre for Cham Culture in Ninh Thuan, said the display aims to popularise the unique culture of the Cham ethnic group in Ninh Thuan amongst domestic and foreign visitors. 

On the occasion of Kate festival 2018, antique collectors from across the nation and abroad donated 14 valuable objects of different materials and dates to the centre, which offer visitors an insight into the iron casting, pottery making, and fabric weaving of the Cham people. 

Since 2010, the centre has received over 900 valuable artifacts from antique collectors.

Source: vietnamtourism.com

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Why do hundreds of South Koreans visit Ayodhya every year

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Fifth Hindu Dham in Combodia, proposed

You are all familiar with chaar dham or four dhams (must pilgrimage sites) yatra in India. Well, it is now being proposed to build a fifth dham in Cambodia.

The Char Dham (“four abodes”) is a set of four pilgrimage sites in India. Vaishnavite Hindus believe that visiting these sites helps achieve “Moksha” (salvation). It comprises BadrinathDwarkaPuri and Rameswaram. It is considered by Hindus that every Hindu must visit the char dhams during one’s lifetime. The Char Dham as defined by Adi Shankaracharya.

Badrinath Dham – courtesy : wikipedia

According to Hindu Dharma, Badrinath became prominent when Nar-Narayan, an avatar of Vishnu, did Tapasyathere. The second place, Rameswaram got its importance in the Tretha-Yuga when Lord Rama built a Shiva-Lingam here and worshiped it to get the blessings of Lord Shiva. The third Dhaam Dwarka got its importance in the Dwapara Yuga when Lord Krishna made Dwarka His residence instead of Mathura, His birthplace.[7]  The fourth one i. e. Puri Dhaam has got its own significance. Lord Vishnu getting worshiped here as Jagannath which is his Avtar for Kali yuga.

Senior RSS leader Indresh Kumar said that Angkor Vat shrine and Mountain Kulen in Cambodia deserve to be the Fifth Dham for Hindus. The RSS has launched a worldwide campaign to complete this Fifth Dhan Project in Angkor Vat.

Angkor Wat temple Cambodia. courtesy:wikipedia

Cambodia was first influenced by Hinduism during the beginning of the Kingdom of Funan. Hinduism was one of the Khmer Empire‘s official religions. Cambodia is the home of the holy temple of Angkor Wat, the largest Hindu temple in the world. The main religion adhered in Khmer kingdom was Hinduism, followed by Buddhism in popularity. Initially the kingdom revered Hinduism as the main state religion. Vishnu and Shiva were the most revered deities, worshipped in Khmer Hindu temples. 

RSS scholar Shailesh Vats who visited Cambodia along with Indresh Kumar, Shyam Parande and Rajiv Ranjan, told One India, “Time has come to link scattered patches of Indian culture to link them with one thread. Relations are strengthen and go on based on faith so 500 acres of land has been acquired in Cambodia. Such a place will be developed out of the present structure that from mental peace to healing everything will be available here.

[Click here to Read more ….]

 

 

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Thailand evolves its own mix of Budhist and Brahmin rituals

The new Brahmins

The relevance of mixing Hinduism with Buddhism and folk beliefs in Thai history

12 Oct 2015 at 03:46 WRITER: MELALIN MAHAVONGTRAKUL 

A man dressed in white blew into a conch as if it were a horn. Joss sticks were burning. Heads bowed but people’s lips were praying. A screenplay on a golden tray was engulfed in a cloud of white smoke…. 

[Click here to read more ….]

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Hindus fear takeover of their temples in Malaysia

Malaysian government is proposing the formation of a Hindu Endowment Board (HEB) in all states with a sizeable Hindu population is to manage all Hindu temples. Hindus view this move of the Malaysian government with suspicion. 

To assuage the fears of the Hindu community, a government spokesperson has said that it is not the aim of the board to take over temples. There has been some misrepresentation of the functions of the board by some individuals who want to settle old scores with some temple managements in the country who were closely aligned with the BN government. The board will serves to protect existing temples, work closely with existing temple committees, and more importantly find ways and means to advance the religious, social and economic interests of Hindu or Indians in the country.

Islam is the official religion of Malaysia. The constitution of Malaysia declares that Islam is the only religion of true Malay people and that natives are required to be Muslims.[22] Conversion from Islam to Hinduism (or another religion) is against the law, but the conversion of Hindus, Buddhists and Christians to Islam is welcomed. The government actively promotes the spread of Islam in the country.[6] The law requires that any Hindu (or Buddhist or Christian) who marries a Muslim must first convert to Islam, otherwise the marriage is illegal and void.[6] If one of the Hindu parents adopts Islam, the children automatically become Muslim without the consent of the second parent.[5][23]

In recent decades, there have been increasing reports of religious persecution of Hindus, along with other minority religions, by various state governments of Malaysia and its Sharia courts.[5][8] Hindu temples built on private property, and built long before Malaysian independence, have been demolished by Malaysian government officials in recent years.[9]

After a violent conflict in Penang between Hindus and Muslims in March 1998, the government announced a nationwide review of unlicensed Hindu temples and shrines. However, implementation was not vigorous and the program was not a subject of public debate.

Between April to May 2006, several Hindu temples were demolished by city hall authorities in the country, accompanied by violence against Hindus.[25] On 21 April 2006, the Malaimel Sri Selva Kaliamman Temple in Kuala Lumpur was reduced to rubble after the city hall sent in bulldozers.[26] The authorities’ excuse was that these temples were unlicensed and squatting on government land.

The president of the Consumers Association of Subang and Shah Alam in Selangor had been helping to organise efforts to stop the local authorities in the Muslim dominated city of Shah Alam from demolishing a 107-year-old Hindu temple. The growing Islamization in Malaysia is a cause for concern to many Malaysians who follow minority religions such as Hinduism.[27]

On 11 May 2006, armed city hall officers from Kuala Lumpur forcefully demolished part of a 90-year-old suburban temple that serves more than 3,000 Hindus. The “Hindu Rights Action Force”, a coalition of several NGO’s, have protested these demolitions by lodging complaints with the Malaysian Prime Minister.[28]

According to a lawyer for the Hindu Rights Action Task Force, a Hindu temple is demolished in Malaysia once every three weeks.[29]

In 2007, Malaysian Hindu organisations protested the destruction of Hindu temples by the Malaysian regime. On 30 October 2007 the 100-year-old Maha Mariamman Temple in Padang Jawa was demolished by Malaysian authorities. Following that demolition, Works Minister and head of the Malaysian Indian Congress Samy Vellu, who is of Indian origin, said that Hindu temples built on government land were still being demolished despite his appeals to the various state chief ministers.

[Click here to read more ….]

Sources : Wikipedia, Picture of Batu By Aruna at ml.wikipedia – Transferred from ml.wikipedia by User:Sreejithk2000 using CommonsHelper., CC BY-SA 3.0, Link, Picture of temple By Kalaivani SomiahOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

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