Take a quiz on Hindu Rituals

Is your knowledge about Hinduism and Hindu rituals is as good as you think it is? Take this simple five minute quiz to find out.

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1. Kumbhmela held at the confluence of Ganga and Yamuna rivers is attended by a hand full of people? Yes/No

 
 

2. Puja should have either mantra or bhajans sung in the praise of the Lord? Yes/No

 
 

3. Which of the following are places of pilgrimage?

 
 
 
 

4. There are only 4 rites of passage and every Hindu must follow them? Yes/No

 
 

5. Hindus in ancient time used to carry Ganga water with them for drinking when travelling overseas? Yes/No

 
 

6. In most Hindu temples, deity is woken up in the morning and set to sleep in the evening? Yes/No

 
 

7. Darshan of a Hindu God is an act of devotee seeing the Lord as well as Lord seeing the devotee? Yes/No

 
 

8. Puja (worship) can only be performed by a Brahmin priest only? Yes/No

 
 

9. A Hindu pilgrimage can only be done by visiting a holy place? Yes/No

 
 

10. Those following the path of Gnan (knowledge) do not have to do any Yajna? Yes/No

 
 

11. Which of the following paths can lead to Moksha (salvation)?

 
 
 
 

12. Each festival has some story and rituals associated with it? Yes/No

 
 

13. Which of the following are samskars (rites of passage)?

 
 
 
 
 
 

14. In a Yajna, oblations are offered into the fire? Yes/No

 
 

15. Yajna (fire-oblation) can only be performed during a marriage ceremony? Yes/No

 
 

16. A Hindu aarti always has song accompanying the waving of a flame or a light?

 
 

17. An aarti can be done to multiple Gods at the same time? Yes/No

 
 

18. Samskara (rites of passage) celebrate major life events? Yes/No

 
 

19. Food offered to God in a puja worship is only meant for God and cant be consumed by devotees? Yes/No

 
 

20. Japa requires you repeat a mantra over and over?

 
 

21. A Hindu must do all the rituals inside a temple only? Yes/No

 
 

22. A Hindu Arti must have a lamp or a flame? Yes/No

 
 

23. Every Hindu must perform Rituals? Yes/No

 
 
Is fire hot or cold?

Thailand evolves its own mix of Budhist and Brahmin rituals

The new Brahmins

The relevance of mixing Hinduism with Buddhism and folk beliefs in Thai history

12 Oct 2015 at 03:46 WRITER: MELALIN MAHAVONGTRAKUL 

A man dressed in white blew into a conch as if it were a horn. Joss sticks were burning. Heads bowed but people’s lips were praying. A screenplay on a golden tray was engulfed in a cloud of white smoke…. 

[Click here to read more ….]

Nyepi – Balanese Hindus celebrate Saka Calendar Hindu New Year

 Nyepi is a Hindu celebration mainly celebrated in BaliIndonesia. It is a day of silence, fasting and meditation for the Balinese. The day following Nyepi is celebrated as Hindu New Year’s Day. The same day celebrated in India as Ugadi. Nyepi is  commemorated every Isakawarsa (Saka new year) according to the Balinese calendar (in 2018, it fell on March 17).

The Hindus of Maharashtra term the same festival, observed on the same day, Gudi Padwa (Marathi: गुढी पाडवा). The Sindhis, people from Sindh, celebrate the same day as Cheti Chand, which is the beginning of their calendar year. Manipuris also celebrate their New Year as Sajibu Nongma Panba on the same day. The Hindus of Andhra Pradesh also celebrate their new year on the same day as Ugadi.

The Melasti Ritual is performed 3–4 days beforehand Nyepi. It is dedicated to Sanghyang Widhi Wasa. The ritual is performed in Pura (Balinese temple) near the sea (Pura Segara) and meant to purify Arca, Pratima, and Pralingga (sacred objects) belonging to several temples, also to acquire sacred water from the sea.The Bhuta Yajna Ritual is performed next to vanquish the negative elements and create a balance with God, Mankind, and Nature. The ritual is also meant to appease Batara Kala by Pecaruanoffering of live animal sacrifice. Around sunset the “Pengrupukan” ceremony begins in the house compounds with the noisy banging of pots and pans and bamboo tubes along with burning of dried coconut leaf torches to drive out the demons.

Most Hindu Balinese villages make ogoh-ogoh, demonic statues made of richly painted bamboo, cloth, tinsel, and styrofoam symbolizing negative elements or malevolent spirits or even characters from Hindu mythology. After the ogoh-ogoh have been paraded around the village, they are burned in the cemeteries although many are displayed in front of community halls for another month or more and sometimes even purchased by museums and collectors.

Nyepi is a day reserved for self-reflection, and as such, anything that might interfere with that purpose is restricted. The main restrictions are no lighting fires (and lights must be kept low); no working; no entertainment or pleasure; no traveling; and, for some, no talking or eating at all. The effect of these prohibitions is that Bali’s usually bustling streets and roads are empty, there is little or no noise from TVs and radios, and few signs of activity are seen even inside homes. The only people to be seen outdoors are the Pecalang, traditional security men who patrol the streets to ensure the prohibitions are being followed.

In 2018, a parade of 7,000 exhibits including a joint Narsimha sanhaar was paraded on the streets.

The Nyepi Rituals are performed as Amati Geni: No fire or light, including no electricity, Amati Karya: No working, Amati Lelunganan: No travelling and Amati Lelanguan: Fasting and no revelry/self-entertainment. The Yoga/Brata Ritual starts at 6:00 a.m. and continues to 6:00 a.m. the next day. The Ngembak Agni/Labuh Brata Ritual is performed for all Hindus to forgive each other and to welcome the new days to come. Finally, The Dharma Shanti Rituals is performed after all the Nyepi rituals are finished.

The day following Nyepi is also celebrated as New Year’s Day. On this day, the youth of Bali in the village of Sesetan in South Bali practice the ceremony of Omed-omedan or ‘The Kissing Ritual’ to celebrate the new year.

On the day after Nyepi, known as Ngembak Geni (Relighting the Fire), social activity picks up again quickly, as families and friends gather to ask forgiveness from one another, and to perform certain religious rituals together. Fires and electricity are allowed again, and cooking of food resumes.

(Source Wikipedia)

Did Indians bring technology of Fire, Farming and tools to Australia Four Thousand Years Ago

Genetic evidence suggests that just over 4 millennia ago a group of Indian travellers landed in Australia and stayed. The evidence emerged a few years ago after a group of Aboriginal men’s Y chromosomes matched with Y chromosomes typically found in Indian men.[…Read More…]

Breaking Bread at Blacktown Harmony Day

Hindu Council of Australia participated in Breaking Bread (having a meal together, or starting a meal) initiative as part of western Sydney’s large Harmony Day celebrations in Blacktown on Wednesday March 21st. The initiative was organized by FoodFaith and held at Bowmans Hall, Blacktown, NSW. FoodFaith is an initiative to bring together people of different faiths using food as a medium.

The initiative aims to showcase breads from different faiths and cultures and celebrate beliefs, customs and traditions and was a large communal activity bringing everyone together. Representatives from Indigenous, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, Punjabi, Pacific, African, and Eastern European faiths and traditions attended the event. Each culture or faith brought samples of their breads to share with others.

Hindu Council took its “Roti” and “Raita” to the event and was represented in the event by Sai Pravastu, Surinder Jain, Vijai Singhal and Kamlesh Chaubey. Both were very much enjoyed by by about a thousand people gathered there,

 

 

Western Australia adds a new chapter to Hindu Council

A WA chapter of Hindu Council of Australia has been established on 12th March 2018.

First program will be to welcome HH Mahant Swami of BAPS by all Hindu Organisations. HCA WA chapter will lead this program to establish relation with other Hindu Organisations in WA.

Second Program will be celebration of International Yoga Day.

Following are the team members of the WA chapter.

1 Damji Koria. -Coordinator
2 Ramesh Shah.
3 Shashi limbachiya.
4 Keyur kamdar.
5 Vijay Kumar.
6 Bijukumar Prabhakaran. .
7 Amool Bhargav.
8. Mrs Sadhana Boss

Congratulations – A new chapter started in Northern Territory

On 20th Mrach 2018, Hindu council has established a new chapter in Northern Territory.

Dr Rajeev Sharma – Coordinator

(other members in the team will be announced shortly).

Dr Rajeev Sharma is long time resident of Darwin. He is working at Charles Darwin University since 1989 and is currently Course Coordinator for MBA DBA Grad Cert Grad Dip courses. He is very active community worker. He was in past few times secretary of Hindu Society of NT (a member organisation of HCA). He was also earlier President of Indian Cultural Society.

Pharrell Williams accused of cultural appropriation of Holi

People are accusing Pharrell Williams of cultural appropriation over his new Adidas line inspired by a Hindu festival

Pharrell Williams and Adidas are being accused of cultural appropriation over a new line of sneakers and apparel that were apparently inspired by Holi, a Hindu spring festival that celebrates love, colors, fertility, and the victory of good over evil. The items in the collection, which is named Hu Holi, are meant to mimic the way white clothing gets doused with colored powder during the Hindu festival. […..Read More…..]

SVT temple is a building of cultural significance

The ‘Acharya envoys’ who propagate Indian culture

Three ‘ambassadors’, whose mandate is to spread yoga and the Vedas in the U.S., explain their vision and mission

In a new initiative by the Narendra Modi government, a band of Indian officials posted to three missions in the U.S. now promote ‘Indian culture’ as part of diplomacy.

[…Read More…]