Gargi Woman Award Press Release

Hindu Council of Australia institutes award for recognizing Australian women

 Sydney : 12 February 2018

 Hindu Council of Australia has instituted annual awards to recognise outstanding contribution by Australian women in the society. The awards would be across multiple categories and will be announced on the occasion of International Woman’s day 2018.

 Speaking about the awards, the President of Hindu Council of Australia, Mr. Prakash Mehta said, “We want to recognise women who have been tirelessly contributing to the Australian society for a number of years. Some of them are well known in their field of work and some less known yet their contribution has been immense. With these awards we aim to recognise their hard work and create role models for younger generation of Hindu girls and women growing up in Australia.”

Further adding Mr. Mehta said, “These awards have been named after the great Hindu Rishika (female sage philosopher) Gargi Vachaknavi. Born around 700 BC, Gargi’s philosophy addresses metaphysical questions about the construction and origin of the universe and is considered to be the first, among many, in the long history of women’s intellectual contributions to human society. So, it’s only fitting that we named the awards her”.
 
The awards will be presented to the recipients during the Parramasala Festival in Parramatta on 11th March 2018.

For further details please contact us.

Half In U.S. Want An End To Slaughterhouses

The Sentience Institute recently conducted a survey of 1,094 United States adults to determine how people in the United States feel about animal agriculture. What they found was surprising. For example, 47.4% of respondents agreed with banning slaughterhouses, 33% agreed with banning animal farming altogether, and 66.9% of respondents agreed that people should eat fewer animal-based foods and more plant-based foods. [Read More …]

Thank you Hindu Benevolent Fund

An anonymous recipient of help from HBF thanks by sending following email:

To
Consulate general of India and Hindu council

I sincerely thanks for all the generous help and support provided to me in my time of hardship. I really appreciate and very thankful for the financial support provided in terms of paying my apartment rent, it actually made a huge difference and helped me a lot.

Thanks

Donate generously to Hindu Benovolent Fund by [Clicking here]

Hindu Saṁskāras

Hindu Saskāras

(Vijai Singhal)

Saskāras are sacraments or holy rites of passage that guide us about our responsibilities in life. There are some 40 Saṁskāras for different milestones in life from the rite of conception to the last rites. Some of the important Saṁskāras are briefly described here. For much fuller and detailed coverage of the subject, please refer to the following links:

  1. Hindu Saṁskāras by Pandit Shri Rama RamanujaAchari : https://www.australiancouncilofhinduclergy.com/books-and-publications.html
  2. Rites of Passage by Himalayan Academy

www.hinduismtoday.com/pdf…/what…/WIH_Sec5_Chapter39.pdf

Sīmantonayana – is performed between the sixth and eighth month of pregnancy. Family takes special care of expectant mother during pregnancy because the physical and mental development of the foetus is dependent on mother’s health. The mother is advised to eat fresh, wholesome, nutritious food, read inspiring books, listen to good music and have good positive thoughts. She is encouraged to avoid negative feelings of anger, hatred, jealousy, violence. What she eats, drinks, thinks, watches, hears, reads affect the baby very much. However, this ceremony is not very common these days.

Nāmakaran – Naming or name-giving ceremony is the first ceremony after the birth of the child. It is performed in the home or the temple, usually when the child is 11 to 40 days old. The father or the aunt (father’s sister) whispers the infant’s name in his/her right ear. Family and friends give gifts. The priest suggests the first alphabet of the name based on the Naksatra(star). Some parents select the names based on names of Hindu gods and goddesses or some heroes to instil those qualities in the child.

Anna-Prāśana – The child is weaned at the age of six months.  Solid food is fed to the child for the first time. Some sweet rice is usually offered to the family deity or to Annapurna Devi and a morsel is fed to the baby with mantras for ensuring health and longevity and protection.

Chudakarana (Mundan) – Head-shaving ceremony is usually performed before the end of the third year in home or temple. The cut hair is gathered into a large ‘roti’ made of dough, wrapped up and disposed of in a river or buried.

Vidyarambha- This sacrament is performed to mark the beginning of the education.   It is performed when the child first goes to school. The child is bathed, dressed in new clothes and fed. Ganeśa and Sarasvati are invoked and worshipped, after facing east the child is taught to write the first letter of the Sanskrit alphabet holding a piece of gold — usually a ring — in a plate of rice.

Upanayana – The sacred thread ceremony is also known as Yagnopaveet. The sacred thread has three strands to remind the child of his responsibilities towards the Guru, parents, and the community. This ceremony is mainly performed in the Brahmin families and is not very common these days.

Vivāh – marriage ceremony is performed in a temple or special hall around the sacred homafire. Lifetime vows are taken and seven steps (Saptapadi) are taken around the fire with the priest explaining the meanings of the vows. The holy union of husband and wife is consecrated. This has become one of the biggest ceremonies these days.

Antyeshti – The funeral ceremony is performed by the relatives of the deceased. It includes preparation of the body, cremation, rites of mourning, purification and remembrance. The eldest son or the grandson, traditionally performs the last rites. The funeral should take place as soon as possible—traditionally, by the next dusk or dawn, whichever occurs first. A priest should be contacted and can help guide in the decision-making process and direct the family to a Hindu-friendly funeral services.

 

 

 

HCA youth join Youth Parliament of World’s Religions Cabinet

Hindu Council of Australia has joined seven other religious groups under the auspicious of Columban Centre for Christian-Muslim relations to conduct Youth Parliament of World’s Religions (PoWR). This will be the fourth year for Youth PoWR. The event is funded by the Columban Centre and may also be assisted by Multicultural NSW.

Youth PoWR is by youth, for youth, with youth. It is planned by a team of young people from various state and national peak religious bodies (the “Cabinet”) who met every month to arrange venue, speakers, process, catering and promotion; they do all the preparatory work and run the event. The speakers and the performers are all youth. The audience participants (the “Members of Parliament”) are all youth.

The youth meet in August/September which is called Youth Parliament and pass resolutions about religious harmony. Accordingly, seven young people from seven different religions addressed the Message to Civic and Religious Leaders

Here is some of what they had to say:

  • The leaders of our faith must foster cooperation and commitment on an ongoing basis, and lead us towards the common good in a world where the good is not always common. (Daniel Ang)
  • I call on the civic leaders present to inspire us with their dialogue and unify us with just policies. Policies which support the weakest and most vulnerable of society. Which embrace freedom of speech but protect an individual’s right to adhere to his or her faith. I call on civic leaders to resist a climate of fear-mongering and uncertainty. To remind us of the successes we are capable of achieving collectively. (Fay Muhieddine)
  • Leaders play a key role to educate the hearts of the youth to be open to all, embrace differences and respect one another, to learn how to live and breathe in harmony. You are the key to building a diverse and harmonious society of which we are all a part. (Su Sian Teh)

With ringing endorsements from the speakers, the message was then voted on and approved unanimously.

Ms Vincy Jain, our youth leader will be a part of the “Cabinet” which will make the event happen. During the planning of the event more youth will be involved. A large gathering of Hindu youth will be mobilized for the main event.

 

International Women’s Day 2018

Hindu council of Australia together with Parramasala invites you to celebrate International Woman’s Day at Parramatta, Prince Alfred Square. Sunday, March 11, 2018 | 11am to 2pm

 

Why does world’s largest particle physics lab CERN has a statue of Lord Shiva

Religion inspires Physics at CERN, Geneva : “Hundreds of years ago, Indian artists created visual images of dancing Shivas in a beautiful series of bronzes. In our time, physicists have used the most advanced technology to portray the patterns of the cosmic dance. The metaphor of the cosmic dance thus unifies ancient mythology, religious art and modern physics.”

[Read more…]

Cumberland Festival of Colours Holi Milan Pendle Hill 2018

Come and join the fun
Let’s paint the town Red – Literally …

Hindu Council of Australia brings to you, Holi – The Cumberland
festival of colours, celebrated at Civic Park, Targo Rd, Pendle Hill with
support from the Cumberland council on Saturday 3rd March 2018. We
expect approximately 2000 people to join us for the Holi celebration.

THIS IS A TOTALLY FREE EVENT

You dont have to register for this event. But we welcome if you do want to register for the event and want to get free tickets (this is purely optional, you are welcome to walk in as tickets are totally FREE) Click here (Go to the month of March 2018 and click on Cumberland festival of Colours Holi to get your free tickets.)

THIS IS A TOTALLY FREE EVENT

To promote your business or to book a stall ONLINE Click here

To download Food_Stall_Application, Click Here.

To download Non-Food Stall & Sponsorship Form, Click Here

To download Holi_Sponsorship pack, Click Here

To download Holi_2018_Sponsorship_Agreement, Click Here

Or for other business inquiries contact :

Sanjeev Goyal 0408 625 176
Manishi Dave 0419 573 328
Vikrant Pahuja 0402 676 548
Bimal Joshi 0430 157 679

More About the event

[Read more…]

Multicultural NSW Consults Religious Leaders

Multicultural department of NSW held a meeting today with various religion’s leaders. The meeting was attended by over 20 people and about 10 different religious groups. Hindus were represented by Hindu Council of Australia and by Australian Council of Hindu Clergy. Director Corporate Services Multicultural NSW explained about a new web portal being designed to continue the communication between religious groups beyond and in between meetings.

[Read more…]

The World’s Oldest Icon Of Feminism

You think Kangana Ranaut is a feminist? You must not have heard about Rishi Gargi then.  The Story Of Rishi Gargi: The World’s Oldest Icon Of Feminism Found In Ancient Hinduism.

[Read More …]