Archives for September 2018

Why do hundreds of South Koreans visit Ayodhya every year

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Hindus join International Day of Peace celebrations in Canberra

Australian Centre for Christianity and Culture held a Multi-faith meeting on the occasion of the International Day of Peace, representing: Hindu, Christian, Islam, Buddhist and Quakers.

(Visited 17 times, 4 visits today)

Kahuta Hindu Temple in Pakistan

This beautiful Hindu temple in Kahuta Pakistan hides a secret

This fascinating Hindu temple in Kahuta Pakistan has a dark story to tell…In 1947, Kahuta had a population of 3500, with half of them Muslims, all living along the main junction of the ring road that went into Kashmir and looped back at the same spot. The Hindus were of the Mahajan caste (patwari, tehsildar, merchants etc.); Muslims were of the Rajput clan and Sikh were in the administration.Sikhs also lived around an adjacent town called the Thoa Khalsa, christened by ‘Bana’ a close confidante of Baba Guru Nanak.

Kahuta has vast fruit orchids (mangoes too), watering ponds, water falls, a vibrant town with Hindu temples, a guru dwara and a Jamia mosque.Incidentally, Ajit Doval of India has mentioned in his book that he spent quite some time around Kahuta and met some closet hindu who recognized his pierced earlobes and nearly blew his cover. The Hindu, he said had a white flowing beard like a Muslim holy man and had deities (moortis’) hidden in his closet.At the end of March 1947, all that was left standing in the shouldering wreckage was the minaret and the obelisk of the Hindu temples — nothing else survived.

Sikhs’ were the magnanimous ruling class, building administrative centers, schools all around Kahuta. The British ended Sikh rule on Kahuta which was then part of Kashmir and handed it over to Rawalpindi district. As Rawalpindi was also directly administered by the British, Hindus gains ascendancy in Kahuta.The same power structure was duplicated in other mixed communities with temples around Rawalpindi like Kurri Shehr, Lal Kurti, Kohati Bazar & Saddar Kabari Bazar & Purana Qila.

 

Muslims stayed the same, poorly educated, politically weak and living in the surrounding mountains.

In March 1947, rumors of Muslim lynching in India reached Kahuta and enraged mobs from the surrounding mountains, especially Narh, came clambering down for revenge. The sacred Sikh town of Thoa Khasa was burned to the ground with 50 Sikh killed in one day.

The mob then besieged Kahuta main town, dowsed the place in petrol and set it on fire. The Hindus, Sikh and Muslims living in the town Centre were all burned to death. Several were reportedly raped. The remaining stunned people fled.

One eye witness of the horror in Kahuta told me “upward of 1000 died in the fire and nothing was left except the minaret & temple spire” — but no one to worship inside.

Mountbatten personally came to visit after the killings. These violent deaths were the result of colonial divide and rule policies, sowing religious divide. I mean, how can you gift Kashmir – a Muslim majority state – to a hindu Dogra? Is it your Phuphi’s walima feast?

Now this temple is the prettiest of all the Hindu worship places I’ve visited around Pakistan. All its religious symbols are still intact. I wish someone would interpret them for me.

I guess the town folks had had enough of violence for the next hundred years — they left the temples alone.

Hate begets hate; there can be no peace till the healing takes place.

If you are in Kahuta to see this temple, don’t forget to see the other hindu temple, which is now home to a lovely Kashmiri family.

By: Wali Imran

This beautiful Hindu temple in Kahuta Pakistan hides a secret

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British Hindus are proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with British Jews

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Neeraj Gupta’s sculpture awarded by Australia

Sydney, Australia: The Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize, presented by Woollahra Council, today
announced 48 emerging and established artists as finalists for the 18th annual Prize and exhibition. The
finalist group was today from 666 entries this year including artists from Australia, India and the
United Kingdom highlighting the Prize’s growing international reputation.

Delhi, India based artist Neeraj Gupta’s work, titled Drifter – III (2018) challenges what he suggests is
the de-humanisation of art in a modern world of super-technology. Using pigment in white cement to
create a stylised bust, Gupta seeks to reject art as information or reduction and return to art as
emotion, harnessing its mysterious power of transcending history and horizontal time to allow his
viewers to see things acutely.

EXHIBITION DETAILS: A free exhibition of all the finalist sculptures will be presented from Saturday
20th until Sunday 11 November 2018 at Woollahra Council. The winners will be announced at the
launch of the exhibition on 19 October with further details to be provided closer to the time. A series
of Artists’ Talks and Community Workshops will be presented as part of the program.

BACKGROUND ON THE WOOLLAHRA SMALL SCULPTURE PRIZE: The Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize is
a national prize for sculptures of smaller dimensions and has attracted strong support from artists,
collectors, benefactors, critics, as well as the local community. The Prize was initiated in 2001 by
Council to support, promote and celebrate artistic excellence, but also to encourage the local
community to access the then, newly renovated Woollahra Council Chambers. The Prize attracts local,
national and international entries each year.

MEDIA CONTACT: To request artist biographies, interviews, imagery and information in relation to the
Prize, please contact Megan Bentley, megan@articulatepr.com.au or Kym Elphinstone,
kym@articulatepr.com.au, 0421 106 139.

(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)

Ganesha Puja held in Adelaide Zoo

Hindu Council of Australia performed Ganesh Chaturathi festival in Adelaide Zoo on 13th September 2018.

 

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Interfaith prayers for Rain

Australia is going through a severe drought. Religious leaders of various faiths including Hindus participated in rituals to bring about rains. Hindu Priest is Pandit Prakash Pandey recited the prayers in Sanskrit. Mr Basu Banka explained the rituals and spoke at the Prayer Service.

 

A sum of $260 was collected for Buy a Bale charity.

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Nominate a woman for Gargi Award

Click here to find out more about Gargi Award and to nominate someone for the award. Self nominations are encouraged.

(Visited 28 times, 1 visits today)